Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

November 1, 2008

Economic Drain from IMF on Prime Economies

The International Monetary Fund has been bailing out emerging and secondary economies, putting prime economies like the U.S. and Britain in line to fork over more major funding. If you thought national deficits and crisis spending were enough, now prime economies have the IMF funding of lesser nations to consider. “Hundreds of millions of dollars” are needed now to support the sagging support structure of the IMF. This is relevant and an important dragging force on prime economies. If you live in the U.S. or Europe, that probably means you.

The cooling economic climate is resulting in economies across the globe taking evasive action to the degree possible, usually using the same methods employed in the United States like lowering central bank interest rates in order to sustain their banks and encourage lending. The IMF is acting as an insurance policy to shore up foundering economies. Prime Minister Gordon Brown is recommending a better insurance system to assist distressed nations, a topic that will doubtless be near the top of the Global Financial Summit in New York City this month. Financial security is now a global watch word.

Banks globally have been racing to bolster their balance sheets after a bevy of collapses and hastily arranged mergers were prompted by heavy losses from bad mortgage and financial derivatives. In the meantime, surface signs indicate a slight lessening in the immediate stability crisis as far as the current market is concerned. The U.S. government is tiptoeing quietly as the presidential election is only days away. More bad news will likely affect the election and most possibly the results. Until then, the U.S. will try to enforce an all quiet on the economic front. Will the stock markets cooperate after a banner week? Ah, there’s the rub. ~ E. Manning

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