Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

November 10, 2008

The Global Finance Summit Rush to Rhetoric

bretton-woodsInternational hullabaloo from UK, France, and Germany for a new international financial architecture moved the G7 Finance Ministers into action. US president George Bush has snubbed the U.N. proposal to host an international summit, instead promoting an G8 summit of key leaders in Washington D.C. on November 15th. If successful, this may be the greatest chance since 1944 to influence the structure of international finance since the Bretton Woods accord. The proposals so far want to put the world’s leading industrialized economies and a select few emerging economies in charge, generally referred to as the G20. The role of central bankers is curiously absent in publicity. Doubtless, central bankers have the pulse of the situation and probably are largely responsible for a more conservative response to the European Union’s vivid promotion and sweeping enthusiasm last month.

global-financial-agreement1Activists have urged world leaders not to lose sight of perceived international challenges like climate change and poverty as authorities focus their efforts to repair the world’s financial system. Politicians are concerned about such things. Central bankers are not.

Not to be outdone or completely humiliated, the president of the U.N. General Assembly announced a high-level task force to review the global financial system, including the World Bank and IMF. ~ E. Manning

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