Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

July 24, 2010

U.S. Worries Over Deflation

The nation has a nasty case of stagnation, fueled by significant employment issues and rising defaults. Prices are falling while most consumers resist buying. When deflation begins and prices fall, it seems like a good thing. Then, lower prices cut into business profits which results in trimming payrolls. This further undermines buying power, which leads to lower profits, fewer jobs and lower wages. All this results in economic contraction.

With all the cutbacks, buyers that have the funds wait for better deals through even lower prices, which magnifies deflation. As a result, the nation plunges into a downward economic spiral that is hard to escape. This is exactly what the United States faces.

The nation’s capital is feeling the guilt as they look at other in dismay about the rising deficit and inflation, even though they advertise to the world that inflation doesn’t exist here. Economists around the world see great potential for deflation of the dollar, which already would be the case, were it not for declining currencies across the globe.

The statistics say it all. Consumer prices have declined each month for the last three months, putting inflation above last year. They claim that the core inflation rate is at a 44 year low at less than one percent. So why are they worried? The Federal Reserve likes to see an inflation rate of 3% because this puts more money in their corporate pockets.

Private economists and financial experts are more concerned. Some of them see the possibility of deflation at more than fifty percent. This is compounded by unemployment, lack of production and lower spending.

Should deflation occur, the central bank has the tools to reverse it according to Ben Bernanke, even though the Federal Reserve has interest rates at historical lows and has pumped trillions into the financial system. The books have been cooked baby, to the loss of the United States. Bernanke claims the U.S. economy is more vibrant and productive than Japan’s was in the 90s. The difference is supposed to be that Japan’s labor face was actually declining, while the States has plenty of labor.

In my words, there are plenty of financially-broken and impoverished Americans to take advantage of, with the hope of restoring the economy on their collective backs. Wall Street and multinationals aren’t suffering beyond the losses of jobs they incurred during the recession. Let’s face facts, they didn’t suffer much at all. Their employees did. That’s the way it is.

The little guy at the bottom, so far, is the one that has truly paid for the recession and the remainder of its fallout. They are ones that will continue to pay.

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