Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

November 16, 2011

Financial Nonsense of GDP & Jobless Figures

Third quarter GDP numbers have no relation to reality  says John Williams of Shadow Stats. He believes that unemployment hasn’t really recovered from the 2001 recession. GDP has become a nonsense number, worthless in terms of having any meaning in terms of the real economy.

July 1, 2011

Recession Warning

Filed under: banking, economy, recession — Tags: , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 11:21 am

economic tsunamiThe Dallas Fed’s latest manufacturing gauge has imploded! It fell to -17.5 from -7.4, the worst reading in 11 months. The New York and Philadelphia indices tanked, and the overall plunge in these up-to-date manufacturing surveys over the past couple of months is one of the worst on record!

The Wall Street Journal reported on Monday …

“The Federal Reserve is just days away from ending one of the major steps to aid the U.S. economy — but the effort has done little to solve the original problem: The government and individuals alike are still heavily in debt.”

The Journal goes on to make the same argument:

“The fundamental problem is that reversing the trend of piling on the debt requires some combination of cutting spending, growing income or the economy, and inflation. But wage growth is stagnant and home prices, which underpin much of the debt problem, are still falling.

“Meanwhile, in a vicious circle, businesses aren’t hiring or investing because they know consumers are tapped out. Banks, for their part, are hoarding cash, being stingy with new loans.

Ben Bernanke admitted in his most recent press conference:

“We don’t have a precise read on why this slower pace of growth is persisting … Some of the headwinds that have been concerning us, like the weakness in the financial sector, problems in the housing sector, balance sheet and deleveraging issues, may be stronger and more persistent than we thought.”

If you’re counting on the Fed to get things right, good luck! They got the dot-com bubble wrong. They got the housing bubble wrong. Their plan to underwrite an economic recovery has proven to be the wrong medicine for what ails the nation.

May 28, 2011

Goldman Sachs Continues to Take Down Nations

Filed under: banking, corporatism, economy, government, recession, video — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 9:39 am

May 12, 2011

Dangerous Inflation is on the Way

Filed under: economy, inflation, recession, stagflation — Tags: , , , — digitaleconomy @ 12:01 pm

I’ve written about false inflation figures for years. The U.S. government continues to pretend that Americans won’t be facing dangerous inflation by 2012. The facts show otherwise.

The Producer Price Index (PPI) increased 0.7% last month. This equates to 8.4% annual wholesale inflation in America! Prices are rising much faster than wages by any means.  April wholesale inflation data reflects an ever-accelerating cost of living in 2011.

Can official government statistics be trusted? Not according to John Williams at Shadowstats.com, whose alternative inflation index shows costs rising four times higher than “official” rates. Since 1980, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) has changed the way it calculates the Consumer Price Index (CPI) in order to account for the substitution of products, improvements in quality and other things.

“Near-term circumstances generally have continued to deteriorate,” says Williams. “Though not yet commonly recognized, there is both an intensifying double-dip recession and a rapidly escalating inflation problem.”

April 3, 2011

The World’s Greatest Ponzi Scheme

Filed under: central bank, credit, economy, government, inflation, money, recession — Tags: , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 9:11 pm

house of cardsIn the month of March, the U.S. government spent more than eight times its monthly tax receipts, including money spent for maturing U.S. treasuries.

The U.S. treasury cleared $128.18 billion in tax receipts during the month of March, but paid out a total of $1.05 trillion, which included $49.8 billion in Social Security benefits, $47.4 billion in Medicare benefits, $22.58 billion in Medicaid benefits and $37.9 billion in defense spending. The real financial beating springs from maturing U.S. treasuries where the U.S. paid out $705.3 billion.

In order for the U.S. government to stay afloat with only $128.18 billion in tax receipts, it had to spend $72.5 billion from the balance of cash on hand. This closed the month at $118.1 billion, including the sales of $18 billion worth of TARP assets. Most importantly, the U.S. treasury had to sell $786.5 billion in new treasury bonds, which it will be required to mature at a still higher in the future in order to keep the shirt of its’ back. Surely this is the greatest Ponzi scheme ever executed on the world as the government endlessly seeks to outrun the debt that it creates. The nation is able to fund government expenditures and pay off maturing debt instruments by issuing new and larger amounts of debt. Up to now the Federal Reserve interest has made this debacle survivable.

At this time the interest payments on the United States national debt is the government’s largest monthly expenditure. The world is waking up to the fact that the U.S. government is truly insolvent and that the benefits of propping up the U.S. dollar will no longer be worth the expense to foreign creditors. The U.S. government Ponzi scheme is being exposed for the world to see.

China is becoming more reluctant to continue buying U.S. treasuries as it positions the yuan to be the world’s new reserve currency. Japan needs to raise $300 billion to rebuild parts of their country that were destroyed by the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster. They will be unable to invest handily in the U.S. or may opt to invest outright in China as money is available. The U.S. desperately needs Japan and the Arab world to roll over national treasuries into larger amounts of new ones. With Arab revolutions taking place across major Saudi states and the U.S. occupying Libya for no good reason at all, the nation is likely see a global disdain for its previously valued treasures that it must sell to cope with the runaway spending and deficits of Congress.

March 15, 2011

Obama’s Plan To Punish Banks

Filed under: banking, business, corporatism, economy, recession — digitaleconomy @ 11:56 am

Large banks targeted“Shock and awe” are in the wings as the Obama administration seeks to force mortgage firms to reduce monthly payments for as many as 3 million distressed homeowners. This is to happen in the next 6 months as part of an agreement to settle accusations for improper foreclosures as well as patent violations of consumer protection laws.

The forced agreement would accomplish four goals set out by state and federal policy makers and regulators as part of multi-agency investigations into abusive mortgage practices by the nation’s largest financial firms. It will punish banks for violations of state law and federal regulations, provide much-needed assistance to distressed borrowers and send a warning to firms about abusing homeowners in the future.

Obama hopes to start a healing process required to clear the large volume of repossessed and soon-to-be-foreclosed homes that’s continue to depress the housing market and prices while draining consumer confidence.

 

February 14, 2011

Scary Facts About Getting a Job in America

Filed under: business, economy, money, recession, stagflation — Tags: , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 12:23 pm

Business Insider published “19 Scary Facts About Getting a Job in America.”

This recession is not another run-of-the-mill post-war recession, nor is it simply what globalism looks like. The recession in the U.S.A.  is a prolonged structural unemployment caused by multinational corporations fleeing high-cost labor markets to exploit low-cost labor markets. The impacts are real and devastating:

1) If you lose your job today, there’s a 70 percent chance you won’t find a job in the next month.

2) If you’ve been unemployed for a year, there’s a 91 percent chance you won’t find a job in the next month.

3) Two million people have exhausted 99 weeks of unemployment benefits. Another four million will do so in 2011.

4) There was zero job growth in the past decade, the worst 10 years on record.

5) In the most optimistic scenarios, payrolls won’t return to 2008 levels until 2013. In that time, the population will grow by 5 percent.

6) More than one in four jobs added to the economy last year were temporary.

7) At 2000 levels of labor force participation, the unemployment rate would be 13 percent.

8) When you count the unemployed, underemployed and discouraged workers, only 47 percent of the work force is fully employed.

9) The number of workers over 55 has increased nearly 8 percent in three years. No retirement means no hiring.

10) Four out of 10 baby boomers said they will have to “work until they drop.”

11) The average length of unemployment is 22 weeks.

12) For workers over 55, the average length of unemployment is 43 weeks.

13) In one of the hardest cities to find a job, Las Vegas, there are nine applicants for every job opening.

14) No jobs crash since the Great Depression of the 1930s even compares to what’s happening now, in terms of the number of jobs lost by the economy as a whole.

15) A 1 percent increase in unemployment leads roughly to a 1 percent increase in suicides.

16) More than 3 million manufacturing jobs have been lost since 1998.

17) The number of motor vehicle manufacturing jobs will decline by 20 percent in the next decade.

18) The number of apparel manufacturing jobs will drop by 57 percent over the next decade.

19) Here is the competition: A network engineer in Bangladesh makes $6,000 a year, while a CEO earns $30,000 on the average.

The Business Insider report concluded with the following observation: “Getting a job today means going up against terrifying odds.”

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