Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

April 3, 2011

The World’s Greatest Ponzi Scheme

Filed under: central bank, credit, economy, government, inflation, money, recession — Tags: , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 9:11 pm

house of cardsIn the month of March, the U.S. government spent more than eight times its monthly tax receipts, including money spent for maturing U.S. treasuries.

The U.S. treasury cleared $128.18 billion in tax receipts during the month of March, but paid out a total of $1.05 trillion, which included $49.8 billion in Social Security benefits, $47.4 billion in Medicare benefits, $22.58 billion in Medicaid benefits and $37.9 billion in defense spending. The real financial beating springs from maturing U.S. treasuries where the U.S. paid out $705.3 billion.

In order for the U.S. government to stay afloat with only $128.18 billion in tax receipts, it had to spend $72.5 billion from the balance of cash on hand. This closed the month at $118.1 billion, including the sales of $18 billion worth of TARP assets. Most importantly, the U.S. treasury had to sell $786.5 billion in new treasury bonds, which it will be required to mature at a still higher in the future in order to keep the shirt of its’ back. Surely this is the greatest Ponzi scheme ever executed on the world as the government endlessly seeks to outrun the debt that it creates. The nation is able to fund government expenditures and pay off maturing debt instruments by issuing new and larger amounts of debt. Up to now the Federal Reserve interest has made this debacle survivable.

At this time the interest payments on the United States national debt is the government’s largest monthly expenditure. The world is waking up to the fact that the U.S. government is truly insolvent and that the benefits of propping up the U.S. dollar will no longer be worth the expense to foreign creditors. The U.S. government Ponzi scheme is being exposed for the world to see.

China is becoming more reluctant to continue buying U.S. treasuries as it positions the yuan to be the world’s new reserve currency. Japan needs to raise $300 billion to rebuild parts of their country that were destroyed by the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster. They will be unable to invest handily in the U.S. or may opt to invest outright in China as money is available. The U.S. desperately needs Japan and the Arab world to roll over national treasuries into larger amounts of new ones. With Arab revolutions taking place across major Saudi states and the U.S. occupying Libya for no good reason at all, the nation is likely see a global disdain for its previously valued treasures that it must sell to cope with the runaway spending and deficits of Congress.

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October 12, 2008

International Bankers: Time is Short

the IMF in better times

the IMF in better times

The International Monetary Fund, an international organization that oversees the global financial system based on economic policies of its member countries, proclaimed that time is short for consensus on the international financial crisis. The finance members of industrialized nations failed to agree on absolute and unified measures to end the crisis. The IMF expects a systemic meltdown if stability in financial markets is not achieved. While the international body recommends “exceptional vigilance, coordination and readiness to take bold action,” the body is leaving the pressure and responsibility on the collective bodies of national Finance Ministers. All this from an international body that claimed in August that there would be no recession in the Eurozone.

Solvency concerns are cited as the chief concern. The reality is that solvency is determined by a set of regulations that can easy be changed, as has happened in the United States. Therefore, the definition of solvency to a reasonable extent is in the hands of Finance Ministers and national leaders. Where such a change is seen as beneficial, such a move buys time when developing a consensus is especially important.

While consensus has been difficult, developing effective means to counteract the global financial crisis has been no less elusive. Panicked Finance Ministers are looking for support from the IMF or other global authorities in a effort to deal with the crisis. Britain has developed an interbank lending guarantee that has other nations stressing to compete.

In general, G-7 and G-20 ideas are essentially the same and somewhat short on creativity. Whether injecting capital into financial institutions and insurance companies, effectively nationalizing them, or buying up worthless mortgage assets, groups of Finance Ministers are chiefly examining the importance of uniform national guarantees to protect individual economies and to avoid creating a currency run. Encouraging monetary liquidity through central banking auctions has become a mainstay in prime economies.

Most telling perhaps is a statement made by the Brazilian Finance Minister, Guido Mangega, “The problems we are facing today in the global economy must be solved by several countries, they can’t be addressed by only one country or a single continent.” Finance Minsters from the G-20, not wishing to be left out of the loop, want emerging economies to be included within the ranks of G-7 Finance Ministers or by implication, involved as part of a larger authoritarian body.

Even Arab nations, whose prosperity seemed to make them immune from catastrophe are now encountering monetary issues, property value declines and business funding problems that threaten the Arab economic fabric as in much of the world. The Arab nations are largely isolated within the Islamic banking community except from within the burgeoning oil market, which in recent years has fueled inflation rates as high as 25 per cent.

As a result of the growing crisis, the United States is seen on many fronts, notably among Muslim leaders, as having no credibility whatever. Resentment, which is already high in religious circles, is multiplying because of the perception of financial betrayal and lack of wisdom. The push for Islamic banking within Muslim circles will continue despite any devaluation of the dollar experienced.

The issue created by injecting capital into banks dilutes monetary value and ownership of individual banks. While these types of measure can create the appearance of stability, diluting monetary value creates an ongoing increase in national, as well as global inflation. With increases in credit and cash generated for financial rescues, the end result is always inflationary as the devaluation of currency sets in. The only short-term winners are holding the gold and living off the interest for their services: central bankers. Meanwhile, central banking policies are behind the continued growth in inflation because a flawed economic model that mandates liquidity through monetary production. This is currently central banking’s best hope for economic stability. ~ E. Manning

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