Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

August 30, 2008

FDIC Prepares for Banking Slaughter

The FDIC is seriously considering its future workload by expanding offices in Dallas, Texas that handle banking closures. However, the FDIC is trying to indicate that the 125,000 foot expansion is due to an increase in workload from the failure of ten banks this year, completed yesterday with the closing of Integrity Bank of Alpharetta, Georgia. 117 banks are now on the FDIC trouble list. The FDIC says that “it’s important to note most banks on the problem list will either cure themselves or end up being acquired by another company.” That is true. What is also true is that many failed banks don’t show up on the list at all. The silver lining in the situation is the number of government jobs that will be needed in the Dallas Metroplex area.

The FDIC reports that non-interest income at banks waned as trading and securitization services slowed. That is an understatement to be certain.

Sheila Bair reported: “We’ll be proposing changes to the current assessment system that will shift a greater share of any assessment increase onto institutions that engage in high-risk behavior to encourage and reward safer behavior.” The lack of honest information from banks has been and continues to be the Achilles heel in FDIC efforts. Fraudulent banking is reported as up by corporate information specialists while government regulators play down the significance of fraud and failure. The fear is palpable, but regulators are full of blather in an effort to convey confidence. ~ E. Manning

Check out an interesting article at RGE Monitor.

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July 15, 2008

Lending Crisis and Fingers of Blame

It is true that very few people actually want to be responsible in the public eye for scandal of any kind. The lending and mortgage crisis that started in the U.S.A. is one more example. Considering that a man or woman in America is supposed to be innocent until proven guilty, you’d never know it to hear the mood in good old U.S.A. Finger pointing is all the rage, trial by public accusation.

Charles Schumer, a ranking member of the Senate Banking Committee, recently penned a letter which created a panic sensation for the bank and the FDIC. IndyMac was focus of a June 26 letter announcing Schumer’s concern about financial deterioration at the bank that was formerly a hingepin for Countrywide Mortgage in the mortgage market. Schumer claims that his letter was old news. That depends who you ask.

The FDIC was inflamed by leaked news that stirred panic overtones. The Office of Thrift Management immediately began fuming. They admitted that the bank was in distress, but (more…)

May 18, 2008

Paradox of Market Turmoil

World financial market turmoil has revealed two paradoxes. The first is that after several years of high profits the global banking sector was thought to be well capitalized, even bullet-proof. Actual capital buffers and provisioning in banking were much less robust than they had seemed. Everyone forgot to measure risk and looked at the profit. Little, if nothing has changed.

The second paradox is that elements of a massive liquidity freeze occurred in certain financial market segments (for example, the United States) within a context of overall excess dollar liquidity worldwide. In other words, because of bad bank securities and the risk of accepting them or trading value-for-value, bankers on a global scale began to refuse to trade with fellow bankers to protect themselves.

World bankers are looking at these arenas for salvation: risk management in financial institut- ions; the originate-to-distribute business model of the large banks; and the coordination of financial regulation and supervision across financial institutions, markets and national borders.

World bankers say that improvement in financial literacy can be made by realigning the incentives among the originators and other participants in the securitization chain through attention to detail. (more…)

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