Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

November 12, 2008

Discouraged U.S. Treasury Takes Other Options

illiquidity support

illiquidity support

The major determination of the initial $700 billion bailout to buy up devalued securities has been scrapped. “Illiquidity in this sector is raising the cost” coupled with continued pressures on consumer credit. “This is creating a heavy burden on the American people and reducing the number of jobs in our economy.” Obviously, Paulson’s original take on the bailout was heavily overestimated.

What U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson has just admitted is that the functionality, transparency and the scope of the defective banking instruments is so poor, that buying them up won’t solve the problem or would involve a significantly larger sum of taxpayer money, showing a huge chasm in the underlying viability in the U.S. and global banking industry and perhaps the U.S. economy as well.

The bailout made only a month ago won’t deliver what was promised. Secretary Paulson pitched the bailout plan as a way to rid bank balance sheets of illiquid mortgage assets. Congress may show resistance to releasing the remaining $350 million in funds for future purposes. The real problem is that the national bailout won’t work at all. Banks are still holding the toxic debt that they created.

92308-paulson-bernanke-testifyThe United States seems to be stuck in a netherworld of economic dysfunction. Now the U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve officials are exploring another facility with the idea of supporting the market for securities backed by assets. Paulson wants to use bailout money to encourage investing again. Investing in a terminally broken system is not the answer and a paramount oversight on Paulson’s part. His misjudgment is just another reason why Paulson should not be allowed to continue to tinker with the financial system. He doesn’t have the expertise required, further muddied by a failed and hopelessly bankrupt and antiquated system. This portends bad things for the U.S. economy and the world, but even worse, the U.S. Treasury is now misrepresenting previous actions without answering to any other authority under the guise of failure. Has anyone really studied the problem enough to be able to develop a core solution?

Continuing to invest in the same bankrupt insanity is poor thinking at best. Trying to convince investors to do the same thing is even worse. There is a push overseas to rebuild a new monetary architecture with a new global financial society. Will desperate American politicians pile on in an effort to redeem themselves and what is left of our failing financial system? What real options does America have?
~ E. Manning

November 3, 2008

Admission of Recession Before the Election?

consumer business crisis

consumer business crisis

Corporate results and outlooks have worsened. Automotive companies worldwide declared October figures were the weakest in 20 years. Economies have continued to weaken and as consumer credit and cash have dried up. Why wouldn’t they? Corporations, with the blessings of the U.S. Congress have sent a treasure trove of jobs overseas, milking the economy and American citizens for everything of real value for years while using the credit carrot to support spending. The federal government has added to the damage with heavy taxation and irresponsible governmental overspending. The mortgage crisis, compounded through a heavily compromised banking system has ensured an early downward trend in the national, if not global, economic cycle.

Before the election, no one wants to admit the evidence or the reality that the United States is in a recession. The European Union readily admits their recession. The U.S. government and its house of paid economists proudly hang onto false hope as if a recession is the end of the world.

Americans cannot deny the effects of the current economic crisis. Admitting a recession is likely to do little where the election is concerned, but there is always hope for the current administration. What most Americans do realize is that the economic crisis is a national security issue that was brought about by politicians in Congress and compounded by short-sightedness.

Trillions of dollars in bailouts have avoided a banking collapse. Congress is eagerly seeking to make things right by spending more taxpayer money than American taxpayers don’t have in the form of a fiscal stimulus package. Congress is remaining very independent before the election, scarcely mentioning the upcoming global summit in New York City. A public date for the summit hasn’t been set as the nation and much of the globe looks in the yawning chasm of a recession of unknown breadth and depth. The current administration is doubtful that anything real will come from the summit. ~ E. Manning

July 30, 2008

Federal Reserve Installs More Confidence

Rhetoric aside, tough times are clearly ahead in the eyes of the U.S. Federal Reserve system. Not one to be outdone, the Fed has moved to expand and strengthen confidence in the U.S. financial system.

The Fed is adopting longer terms for banking institution loans through its lending provisions. Since other central banks are involved in the economic bailout, the European Central Bank and the Swiss National Bank are “adapting the maturity of their operations” as well.

In the words of the Federal Reserve, “continued fragile circumstances in financial markets” continue to exist. Federal Reserve provisions would be withdrawn should the FOMC Board decide that “conditions in financial markets are no longer unusual and exigent.”

Provisions include:
1. Extension of the Primary Dealer Credit Facility (PDCF) and the Term Securities Lending Facility (TSLF) through January 30, 2009.
2. The introduction of auctions of options on $50 billion of draws on the TSLF.
3. The introduction of 84-day Term Auction Facility (TAF) loans as a complement to 28-day TAF loans.
4. An increase in the Federal Reserve’s swap line with the European Central Bank to $55 billion from $50 billion.

~ E. Manning

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