Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

November 16, 2011

Financial Nonsense of GDP & Jobless Figures

Third quarter GDP numbers have no relation to reality  says John Williams of Shadow Stats. He believes that unemployment hasn’t really recovered from the 2001 recession. GDP has become a nonsense number, worthless in terms of having any meaning in terms of the real economy.

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July 31, 2011

Realities Behind the U.S. Debt Crisis

While incompetent and corrupt politics continues to announce a huge divide between sides, the real truth is that Americans have been deceived. The last election proved how little difference exists between moderates on either side, and that is what politics in the United States plays to. Despite the rhetoric in debt crisis debate, there are few meaningful differences in the plans that are being voted on.

Both bills have been estimated to reduce the national budget deficit by around $900 billion over the next 10 years, which is small change in a nation that is overspending by 50%. $750 billion is linked to actual decisions to cut spending. The remaining savings are another accounting gimmick, a projected reduction in interest payments on the national debt because of the proposed budget cuts. $70 billion of the “huge savings” will be applied to 2012 and 2013. As usual, deciding to do anything meaningful always points off somewhere in the distant future. $70 billion is small potatoes for a large economy that continually overspends by increasing margins.

The real issue resides in the fact that the nation has an unstable fiat currency that has been losing its purchasing power for decades. Today, the well is virtually dry, which could easily result in the collapse of the dollar as international currency. This makes the reality of planning ahead a mere mental exercise instead of meaningful in any way. What is worse is that all this fancy accounting is dependent on an unrealistic gross national product of 4.86%. As a result, this budgeting is an exercise in smoke and mirrors.

If you live in the United States, you’ve probably heard the grim news. National GDP growth for the first quarter of 2011 was just revised down yesterday by 81% from 1.91% to 0.36%. Never mind that 1.91% is paltry growth anyway. Second quarter estimates for the nation look even worse as the Federal Reserve prints more fiat dollars than ever before. Printing greenbacks doesn’t create economic growth or employment.

As the Federal Government wriggles in credit agony, the Treasury had $51.6 billion available for discretionary spending. The U.S. Treasury expects to bring in $172.4 billion from August 3rd through August 31st in tax receipts, while being scheduled to pay out $306.7 billion. This means a projected deficit of $134.3 billion. The Federal Government is scheduled to make its interest payment of $30 billion on the national debt on August 15th. They are now on track to spend a record $514.5 billion this year on interest payments alone. The nation faces an increase of the interest rate because of a likelihood of a credit downgrade, which would destroy any deficit reductions proposed by national politicians.

The Treasury has been able to pay bills in recent weeks by using accounting gimmicks, but that has come to an end in a few days. The Federal Government is in a real pickle without more fiat money printed by the Federal Reserve. Prioritizing incoming tax receipts of an expected $174.2 billion is essential, which will include the $30 billion interest payment on August 15th to avoid default.

The immediate obligations to the populace in August are $49.2 billion in Social Security, $50 billion in Medicare and Medicaid, topped by $12.8 billion in unemployment benefits. $23 billion of $49.2 billion in Social Security payments are due to be paid on August 3rd. $59 billion in treasury bills are due on August 4th to pay back investors. This says nothing of $31.7 billion in defense payments to pay soldiers and the like.

As a U.S. debt default and credit shortage looms, investors continue (so far) to invest in Treasury Bonds as a safe haven, which would be worthless in the event of a national default. All of this assumes, of course, that they don’t rewrite all the rules because of the need to save the international economy. I’m surprised that they haven’t already taken over the ‘renegade’ credit agencies in the name of national security so that the world can continue to ride the dollar bubble.

After all the politics, interest rates are likely to be propelled rapidly upward, resulting in obvious hyperinflation that cannot be quietly manipulated or explained away. The world is flooded with American greenbacks, thanks in no small part to the uninspired management of Ben Bernanke and the Federal Reserve. As a result, the Federal Reserve is likely to be the only buyer for U.S. debt. How long will that last as it is?

February 4, 2011

Bernanke: Catastrophic Implications for U.S. Economy

Filed under: banking, business, corporatism, economy, federal reserve, government, money, recession — Tags: , , , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 6:09 am

 

USA facing debt crisis

Ben Bernanke of U.S. Federal Reserve has warned that the failure to promptly raise the national debt ceiling would catastrophic.  This catastrophe would clearly have a negative impact on paper assets denominated in dollars and other fiat currencies.

Bernanke was blunt about the threats by some congressional Republicans to use the upcoming debt-ceiling vote as sledgehammer to force harsh spending cuts:

“I would very much urge Congress not to focus on the debt limit as being the bargaining chip in this discussion, but rather to address directly the spending and tax issues that we have to deal with in order to make progress on this fiscal situation,”

“Beyond a certain point … the United States would be forced into a position of defaulting on its debt. And the implications of that on our financial system, our fiscal policy and our economy would be catastrophic.”

It’s important to realize that Bernanke did not use his typical conservative language regarding the necessity of addressing U.S. fiscal challenges. To the contrary, he painted a bleak picture of the possible consequences of failing to act:

“… if government debt and deficits were actually to grow at the pace envisioned, the economic and financial effects would be severe. Sustained high rates of government borrowing would both drain funds away from private investment and increase our debt to foreigners, with adverse long-run effects on U.S. output, incomes, and standards of living. Moreover, diminishing investor confidence that deficits will be brought under control would ultimately lead to sharply rising interest rates on government debt and, potentially, to broader financial turmoil. In a vicious circle, high and rising interest rates would cause debt-service payments on the federal debt to grow even faster, causing further increases in the debt-to-GDP ratio and making fiscal adjustment all the more difficult.”

November 4, 2010

U.S. Fed Opens New Office

Filed under: banking, business, central bank, corporatism, economy, federal reserve, recession — Tags: , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 12:58 pm

“The Federal Reserve Board on Thursday established the Office of Financial Stability Policy and Research and appointed Board economist J. Nellie Liang as its director.

The office will bring together economists, banking supervisors, markets experts, and others in the Federal Reserve who will be dedicated to supporting the Board’s financial stability responsibilities. The office will develop and coordinate staff efforts to identify and analyze potential risks to the financial system and the broader economy, including through the monitoring of asset prices, leverage, financial flows, and other market risk indicators; follow developments at key institutions; and analyze policies to promote financial stability. It will also support the supervision of large financial institutions and the Board’s participation on the Financial Stability Oversight Council.”

“The Office of Financial Stability Policy and Research brings together a skilled group of people with a wide range of expertise to focus solely on financial stability,” Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke said. “The financial stability team will play an important role in implementing the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, in our oversight of systemically important financial institutions, and in our overall surveillance of the financial markets and the economy.”

http://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/press/other/20101104a.htm

 

October 15, 2010

US Inflation Not High Enough Says Bernanke

Wages are stalled, job numbers are anemic, prices are up and social security payments are frozen. The Fed’s policymaking committee “is prepared to provide additional accommodation if needed to support the economic recovery and to return inflation over time to levels consistent with our mandate.” Apparently, action is needed, even though Bernanke is speaking in yesterday’s terms.

According to Bernanke, current inflation numbers are well below the Fed’s objective of 2%. He is worried about deflation caused by printing dollars. Now the Fed will print more dollars and buy securities on the back end in a sort of mock economic transaction. Inflation and Fed profits are the main concern. Inflation allows central bankers to take an additional cut of economic life blood for their services.  In the past, Bernanke has tried upselling to Wall Street. Today, many news articles are claiming that the Fed plans to tame inflation.  He expects to create inflation, but does the Fed have the control it needs to regulate that inflation?  Bernanke thinks so. Bernanke claims to believe that the Fed’s intervention will stimulate the economy, reduce unemployment and prevent deflation. Clearly, the Fed thinks they are large and in charge. This comment and others were made to show intent about “avoiding a double-dip recession.”

Chairman Ben Bernanke said this morning that the Federal Reserve is prepared to take new action to boost the economy.  Inflation has been too low of late and unemployment is poised to come down too slowly. They intend to create inflation. Are you ready for the fallout?

Meanwhile in the United Kingdom, Justice Minister Ken Clarke warned that world is “in grave danger of financial collapse.” He warned that western nations are “not out of the woods yet”…”We have rescued ourselves for the moment from being bracketed with the weaker brethren with doubts about our credit rating and the costs of our borrowing, but if we fail to deliver the kind of program we have set out we will be back there all too soon if we are not too careful.”  Clarke’s comments come only six days before the coalition government’s massive spending cuts are announced. The U.K. government argues that the cuts are necessary to restore the economy to health. Opponents claim they will push the U.K. into a double-dip recession.

 

August 7, 2010

Dollar Deflation & the Grave Economy

Dark economic clouds are gathering over the United States as a second stage of national distraction arrives. Now that the BP disaster is over with, a new topic of angst is needed. Right on cue, the Federal Reserve and Ben Bernanke are considering the economic pains of their patient while looking after their own corporate bottom line and the continued enrichment of international bankers.

Bernanke warned in a speech eight years ago that “sustained deflation can be highly destructive to a modern economy” by leading  to a slow death from a rising real burden of debt. “Sufficient injections of money will ultimately always reverse a deflation,” claimed Bernanke.

New banking assessment by big commercial banking interests (Barclays, RBS, et al.) outside the U.S. show that the dollar is in a corner. Wedged tighter in that corner is the United States, which is now wholly dependent on the banking debt that continues to strip the nation. Uncle Ben and his international banking buddies are facing deflationary pressures as economic pressures fueled by rampant unemployment. Their perfect answer will be to start up the printing presses and to flood the international market with still more dollars, which I must admit will only fuel the fire of deflation.

One answer is to create another crisis with competing currencies. The Euro is a perfect candidate for more distraction, while international bankers continue to drain European and Asians nations of their wealth wherever possible. The Wall Street expansion into Europe and Asia has created still more opportunities to distract from dollar reality. Believe it or not, there are still more precious resources to drain. Multinational corporations are now in the cross hairs.

President Obama doesn’t really enter the equation. Perhaps he will once again arise to take “full responsibility” as he did in the BP debacle. No matter. The Washington lawmakers that create brilliant policy don’t matter, except to approve the imaginary creation of still more greenbacks, ringing their hands in political pretense as they hold out their hands for kickbacks and such. All of these cronies are mere cosmetic agents as international bankers continue the next phase of their rape and pillage policy. Bernanke is preparing to start with massive quantitative easing.

The warfare manual for international bankers says to print more dollars. They haven’t hit their 5 trillion dollar target yet. That is their goal. To completely denude the resources and capital of nations so that they can create their own nation that officially rules over all nations. They have the nations and banking community. They now seek the sustenance of the corporate oligarchy. Wall Street is simply a vehicle to bring this about. They seek ultimate power while pretending to be obsequious and eager to please. The idea is to bring the current system to its knees. Even though we have been conned by phoney money, they hold almost all of the real resources of value. We think the debt is real and have traded all manner of resources and labor for it.

Meanwhile, economic contraction is in the wings for the United States. The leading indicator per the Economic Cycle Research Institute is falling faster than since World War II. CPB Netherlands shows real issues with world trade. There is plenty more behind the scenes that shows a truly grave problem for thinking inside the box. Prepare for the unthinkable.

July 28, 2009

Bernanke: Trying to Save Face

Filed under: banking, corporatism, credit, economy, inflation, investment, money — Tags: , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 1:31 am

puppetFor the last week, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke has been advertising his personal integrity without trying to take an actual stand. He admits that criminal conduct in high finance and investment must be prosecuted and that having to bail out the likes of Wall Street firms that continue to play high stakes gambling games makes him ill. Bernanke continues to try to straddle the fence as he justifies the decisions made as his refusal to allow America to enter a second Great Depression. He offers little fire or passion to see any change beyond making admonitions toward change in the system to protect the nation from avarice. Bernanke readily admits that if adjustments are not made soon, America faces the acute risk of uncontrolled inflation. His need to express his personal integrity almost seems comical as he performs what must be one of the toughest and most thankless jobs on the planet, at least in the public eye.

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