Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

May 2, 2011

China Considering Dumping US Investments

The U.S. dollar continues to slide in value as out of control spending continues. China, the largest holder of U.S. debt, is considering dumping two-thirds the dollar reserves that it holds, to the tune of about $3.04 trillion.

According to a report from China’s Xinhua news agency, a member of the Chinese central bank’s monetary policy committee is recommending that Beijing reinvest its foreign exchange reserves. Other Chinese financial authorities confided at a forum in Beijing that China’s current U.S. holdings are too high. The governor of China’s central bank has said that China’s foreign exchange reserves are excessive and that Beijing should begin to diversity its vast pool of dollars.

While American corporations have led the world in economic growth for more than a century, China’s government has had enough business sense to become the world’s second largest economic power. China is on target to overtake the U.S. economy.

Central bankers and many investors want to unplug the dollar as the international mainstay of finance. China wants its currency to play a more dominant role in the global economy, dumping the dollar (treasuries) as a viable investment, since the Federal Reserve is addicted to printing money, which further devalues the dollar to keep the current global money scene afloat.

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November 7, 2010

Obama Admits Decline of US Dominance

Filed under: business, corporatism, economy, globalization, government, money, politics, recession — Tags: , , , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 6:27 pm

Today, President Barack Obama said that the USA was no longer in a position to “meet the rest of the world economically on our terms.”

Speaking at a town hall meeting in Mumbai, he said,

“I do think that one of the challenges that we are going face in the US, at a time when we are still recovering from the financial crisis is, how do we respond to some of the challenges of globalization? The fact of the matter is that for most of my lifetime and I’ll turn 50 next year – the US was such an enormously dominant economic power, we were such a large market, our industry, our technology, our manufacturing was so significant that we always met the rest of the world economically on our terms. And now because of the incredible rise of India and China and Brazil and other countries, the US remains the largest economy and the largest market, but there is real competition.”

“This will keep America on its toes. America is going to have to compete. There is going to be a tug-of-war within the US between those who see globalization as a threat and those who accept we live in a open integrated world, which has challenges and opportunities.”

President Obama disagreed with those who saw globalization as evil. He did warn that protectionist impulses in the USA will get stronger if Americans don’t see trade bringing in gains for them.

“If the American people feel that trade is just a one-way street where everybody is selling to the enormous US market but we can never sell what we make anywhere else, then the people of the US will start thinking that this is a bad deal for us and it could end up leading to a more protectionist instinct in both parties, not just among Democrats but also Republicans. So, that we have to guard against.”

President Obama noted that America could not continue to promote trade at its own expense at a time when economic power in India and China is rising. “There has to be reciprocity in our trading relationships and if we can have those kind of conversations – fruitful, constructive conversation about how we produce win-win situations, then I think we will be fine.”

October 9, 2010

World economy breaking with US

As the US economy teeters on the edge of decline and a double dip recession, emerging economies continue to grow at a fast pace, fueled by multinational corporations. This changing global economy reveals a United States that is not the center of the economic world.

Financial leaders have joined hands to decide how to boost the global economy at the annual IMF and World Bank meeting. A number of these financial leaders suggest a break up, what is known as a “de-coupling”, in the wings for a number of years, but gaining traction as the US economy stagnates. Central bankers, along with complicit US politicians, have rode the US horse into the ground and now have their eyes on the next rising star to enhance their prosperity. Most politicians advertise that the US will live forever, even though powerhouse nations through history have ebbed like the tidal flow.

The world is breaking away from the US as the consumer of last resort,” said analyst Edward Harrison, the founder of CreditWriteDowns.com. “You’ll see a lot more importance in China, in Russia.” Corporate multinationals and US politicians have raided the US economy over the last thirty years and put that stock in other economies like China, Brazil, Russia and India in the name of globalism. The view is that growth in the global economy will be much more dependent upon these countries than on the “developed economies.” Whether this is true or not remains to be seen.

Meanwhile, the US continues to run by idiot lawmakers that are afraid of multinational corporate power or are having their pockets lined behind the scenes. Like the old Roman Empire, the US seems bent on its’ own self-destruction to salve the interests of a few “leaders of men.”

November 22, 2009

America and Sub-Optimal Solutions

Some economists and talking heads are finally figuring out that a national political paralysis is not a good thing. For generations the U.S. political system has been closely connected with money and a well-funded lobby. Gerrymandering on the part of politicians picks only the pockets of America. Americans have lost almost all control and China is cleaning the clocks of America. They own the U.S. national government through huge loans and in turn, the capital and power of the American people.

Now columnist Thomas Friedman is worried that America is producing “sub-optimal solutions” to big problems like an education system in decline and a weak economy. He also thinks cable news television distorts the truth and that the internet can be a terrible thing for the nation’s politics. He claims that American businesses have left the country, participating in America only when it suits their needs. Why? The corporate oligarchy is looking only after themselves. National concerns are not truly relevant to them.

Friedman talks about a crisis in self-governance but leaves out influence of the people. Strangely, Friedman doesn’t seem very concerned about the well-being of the American people or freedom of expression. He sees open viewpoints as a vehicle for extremists. He is concerned only with corporatism and how this is linked with government with the means of controlling the current power structure.

October 24, 2008

The Fear of EU Leaders

U.S. quietly key player

U.S. quietly key player

President Nicolas Sarkozy of France, the current placeholder of the rotating EU presidency, is spearheading the planned global summit in New York City. He expects concrete decisions to come out of the economic summit next month, which must address the underlying causes of the crisis rather reciting world crisis effects. “We have all understood that it will not be possible to simply meet and have a discussion. We need to turn it into a decision-making forum.”

Most of the world economies seem keenly interested in creating a new global solution to save the global economy and themselves from much economic pain. EU leaders and some other world leaders have voiced a certain amount of fear regarding the cooperation of the United States, who has remained very much on the back burner of the global summit considering its usual role. The election is undoubtedly playing a role in U.S. hesitation and resistance. 

Even Japan and China have become very interested in global economic solutions. Sarkozy told Chinese President Hu Jintao that he fears the United States, which is wary of excessive regulation, would be content if the summit produced “principles and generalities.” That is the real fear of EU leaders since they seem to be looking for radical global change and protection rather than placation and stop gap measures. ~ E. Manning

Global Financial Overhaul Recommended

May 7, 2008

Central Bankers Sound Alarm Over Food Prices

Soaring food prices are helping to push up inflation all around the world, say central bankers. They urge more market competition and free trade to even out prices.

Which came first: the chicken or the egg? In this case, central bankers are not admitting that high food prices are not only caused by tighter supplies but higher inflation is caused by the central bankers themselves. Central bankers, by nature are quiet animals that never point at themselves. In this instance, global inflation has been boosted by the excessive printing of money and overextension of bank credit coupled with the inflation and devaluation of the dollar, which still operates as the tour de force of the global economy.

Global rises in food, energy and other commodity prices (more…)

February 4, 2008

China Denies Bank Bail-Out

Filed under: banking, central bank, money — Tags: , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 12:02 am

Agricultural Bank of China, the weakest of the country’s big four commercial banks, denied it is to receive up to US$50 billion in government bail-out funds. The bank, whose indiscriminate lending in support of the agricultural sector has made it technically insolvent, is in need of funding if it is to become solvent.

The Chinese government has really been holding out on these boys. I think this shows incredible wisdom. If governments were not so quick to bail commercial banking out, bankers would act more responsibly and would not be dependent on handouts because of their bad decisions. As bad as it sounds, more banks need to go out of business. Darwin and scientists call it “survival of the fittest”. ~E.M.

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