Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

April 14, 2009

Bernanke: It’s All About the System

monopoly moneyPresident Obama declares that the sun is coming out as the economic storm wanes. “The financial and economic risks posed by a collapse of AIG would have been at least as great as those created by the demise of Lehman. In the case of AIG, financial market participants were keenly aware that many major financial institutions around the world were insured by or had lent funds to the company. The company’s failure would thus likely have led to a further sharp decline in confidence in the global banking system and possibly to the collapse of other major financial institutions. At best, the consequences of AIG’s failure would have been a significant intensification of an already severe financial crisis and a further worsening of economic conditions. Conceivably, its failure could have triggered a 1930s-style global financial and economic meltdown, with catastrophic implications for production, incomes, and jobs. The Federal Reserve and the Treasury agreed that in the environment then prevailing, AIG’s failure would have posed unacceptable risks for the global financial system and for our economy.” – Ben Bernanke in speech to Morehouse College

Magic Money T-ShirtThe American taxpayers have been put on the hook to bail out Wall Street.  Success is still not guaranteed despite a recently sunny disposition. Meanwhile the European Union supports a new monetary system and retirement of the dollar as the prop of the global community that central bankers have long proffered. The general undercurrent in much of the EU underwrites “the collapse of the Bretton Woods system based on the US Dollar as sole pillar of the global monetary system.” This was predicted by some parties in the EU last year, but so far has not come to pass because of the creativity and financial manipulation of the International Society of Central Bankers.

Advertisements

January 28, 2009

Congress: We are not the Experts (The Real Truth about the U.S. Economy)

kanjorski-banking-economyIn a CSPAN interview, Democrat Representative Paul Kanjorski, the Capitol Markets Subcommittee Chairman, made some revealing confessions about the expertise of the U.S. House and Senate, the facts behind the scenes during the EESA Stimulus plan last year and the real plight of the U.S. economy.

the actions of the Secretary of Treasury and EESA bailout

“Things were done that were misunderstood. We did not give the $700 million for the purpose of lending money. It was never in the program (TARP, EESA) It was misconstrued initially and put together with the suggestion by the Secretary of Treasury that we would be buying what we called dirty assets, defective mortgages and securities in these banks and that the government would find a way to create a market, buy them in, take them off the balance sheets so that the banks could continue to function normally…I supported that. But another part of the bill, we gave jurisdiction and authority to the Secretary of the Treasury to make investments in banks. He had very wide authority because, quite frankly, we (Congress) are not the experts on the Hill as how to solve this problem and the problem is multifaceted, so we gave great flexibility to Secretary of Treasury to act.”

The near collapse of the economy and U.S. government

“I was there when the Secretary and the Chairman of Federal Reserve came those days and talked with members of Congress about what was going on. It was about September 15th. Here’s the facts: we don’t even talk about these things. On Thursday, at about 11 o’clock in the morning, the Federal Reserve noticed a tremendous drawdown of Money Market Accounts in the United States to the tune of $550 billion. It was being drawn within the space of an hour or two. The Treasury opened up it’s window to help. They pumped $105 billion into the system and quickly realized that they could not stem the tide. We were having an electronic run on the banks. The decided to close down the operation, close down the money accounts and announce a guarantee of $250,000 per account so that there wouldn’t be further panic out there. That is what actually happened. What if they had not done that? Their estimation was that by 2 o’clock that afternoon $5.5 trillion would have been drawn out of the money market system of the United States, would have collapsed the entire economy of the United States and would have, in 24 hours, the world economy would have collapsed. We talked about, at that time, what would have happened, if that had happened. It would have been the end of our economic system and our political system as we know it.”

“That’s why, when they made the point, we’ve got to act and do things quickly, we did. Now, Secretary Paulson said, Let’s buy out these subprime mortgages. Give us latitude and large authority to do many things as we decide necessary and give us $700 billion to do that. Shortly after we enacted our bill with those very broad powers, the UK came out and said ‘No, we don’t have enough money to buy toxic assets. Instead, we are going to put our money into banks so that their equity grows and they’re not bankrupt. The UK started that process. That’s true, it was much cheaper to put more money in banks as equity investments than to start buying their bad assets. It was early determined that we would have to spend 3 to 4 billion dollars of taxpayer money to buy these bad assets. We didn’t have it. We only had $700 billion.”

“So Paulson made a complete switch, went in and started putting money in and buying securities and investing in banks in the United States. Why? Because if you don’t have a banking system, you don’t have an economy. Although we did that, we didn’t have enough money and as fast as we did that, the economy has been falling. We are really no better off than we were off today than we were three months ago because we have had an decrease in the equity positions of banks. Other assets are going sour by the moment.”

the real truth of the matter according to Paul Kanjorski

“Now, we’ve got to make some decisions. Do we pour more money in to the extent that the money goes in…I, myself, think that we ought to take the time, analyze where we are, have the people (American public) understand…We need to really inform (the public) as to the facts and get input (from them). Perhaps (the public) has better ideas. We aren’t any geniuses in economics or finance. We are representatives of the people. We ought to take our time, but let the people know that this is a very difficult struggle. Somebody threw us out in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean without a life raft and we are trying to determine the closest shore and whether there is any chance in the world to swim that far. WE…DON’T…KNOW.”

Remember who actually threw the economy into “the middle of the Atlantic Ocean without a life raft.” We can offer that credit to greedy unscrupulous bankers, a corrupt banking community, unattentive government regulators and politicians that gloried in the temporary economic bubble that the moral bankruptcy created. Never forget that America! ~ E. Manning

U.S. stimulus trivia: the latest stimulus provision provides enough spending to give every man, woman, and child in America $2,700.
President Obama has said that his proposed “stimulus legislation” will create or save 3 million jobs. This means that this legislation will spend at least $275,000 per job. The average household income in the U.S. is $42,000 a year. The way that the stimulus is currently written will probably save mostly state and federal government jobs. The current stimulus is not designed principally for economic stimulus for Main Street.

July 24, 2008

Europe Uneasy about Market Collapse

Europe has been suffering from a loss of confidence while forecasting downright dismal news on the banking and economic front. Investors are buggy about the European stock market folding up as they watch the region’s pension funds and insurers uneasily. Stock indexes all over the world have fallen more than 20 percent from recent peaks, creating a bunker mentality.

The prospect of forced selling by European insurers prompted the last stock market collapse in 2003. Pension fund fears loom large, both in Europe and the U.S. However, Europe fears that the plight of EU pension funds could worsen the situation by (more…)

March 18, 2008

Fear and Lack of Confidence

With Wall Street hit by a crisis of confidence, many cast their hope on the nation’s central bank. The Federal Reserve’s typical weapon of interest rates cuts will do only so much so fast and often has an inflationary side effect. Most economists expect a big slash of three-quarters of a percentage point today. The same economists in favor of such a move concede an interest rate reduction will do little to calm investor fears. Concerns that another institution will follow the collapse of Bear Stearns is one reason that the Fed is expected to deliver another big rate cut.

The Fed’s emergency move on Sunday is likely feeding more fears than hopes. Some even believe that shoring up the economy by saving Wall Street firms is not the thing to do. So far, the extent of the bailout for Wall Street has not gone to the country’s bottom line: the American taxpayer and the national deficit. Part of the bailout is temporarily financed and is making the Fed a little interest money for the short-term.

In the meantime, the interest rate cuts are fueling further inflation and creating devaluation pressures, which will in turn fuel higher prices, especially for food and fuel. Economic critics say that a full percentage point cut would send the dollar into a potential collapse. “We’re in a free fall now, wait till you see what a collapse looks like,” says Rich Yamarone, director of economic research at Argus Research.

update:

In news this afternoon, the Federal Open Market Committee decided today to lower its target for the federal funds rate 75 basis points to 2-1/4 percent. This is a total reduction of a full point this week.

Blog at WordPress.com.