Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

April 12, 2010

Multinational America & Cheap Labor

Even highly educated Americans can hardly win with a nationwide crisis of underemployed and unemployed. Clearly, America lives in the age of the wage slave, a time of mindlessness and lack of creativity. Corporate America remains addicted to outsourcing overseas, especially where cheap Indian labor is concerned. Now globalist academia, notably the University of Houston, is outsourcing teaching assistant jobs to India. Globalists are doing much more than that. Even Houston is a new center of foreign training basking in the warmth of  globalist conceit. Meanwhile, Bill Gates vis-à-vis Microsoft, has continued to sack the prospect of American jobs by sending them overseas. Since Gates can’t bring Indian help legally into America by the truckload, he is sending precious jobs overseas at a time when an unprecedented number of qualified educated Americans are out of work. Almost half of the those on the unemployed rosters have been out of work for more than six months. It seems to me that the time is nigh to outsource the national sociopaths.

It is high time to move away from the falsehood of corporate globalism to consider employing educated U.S. citizens. Having experience myself in dealing with teams of the hired from Mumbai, I must admit that they seem to be bright people on the surface. They are humble and do what they are told. Hell yes, they are eager to please! That is where the panacea ends folks! You will tell them again and again, yes… and again. You will spend hours in special conference calls dealing with “the meeting of the minds,” as they continue to pour out work that most children can do.

Multinationals: your jobs building another nation.

The communication and cultural barrier looms large as work is redone over and over. As far as being eager to please, this is hardly a surprise since corporate buildings spring from some of the worst slums of India, corporate neighbors that gleam in contrast to some of the worst ghettos the world will see. Who wants to leave a pretty polished office in favor of a human black-hole of mud and cardboard? It is time to fully realize that this is a human rights issue. Elevating foreigners that live in mud holes seems to be the human thing to do, unless you are merely elevating them to the underpaid wage-slave status as they fight in their minds about what the hell is in the minds and attitudes of managers in Corporate America. Surely “Bob Cratchit” had it no better and we have the nerve to think that globalism is doing them a favor, kind of like how imperial Britain was good for India too.

Meanwhile, the good boys and girls at Deloitte, Price Waterhouse , Microsoft, IBM and the whole lot of lousy multinational sleezoids continue to undermine and use an entire planet of human beings for what is good for corporate needs at the moment while basking in the glow of sustainability and green politics. You can add all of Wall Street and their overseas markets to the list too because this behavior is all the same thing.

Behind the corporate scenes in India, destined for a third world U.S.A.

That isn’t enough for “Multinational America.” This well-funded, organized racket is built on lies of an American labor shortage that oozes from ivy league “innovation.” They have legitimized the crime of selling out “spoiled Americans” in the hope of instilling and importing India’s caste system into the United States for their own benefit. They are debasing the nation so they can continue to ply their usury on the nation as they pimp globalism to proffer their bottom line and the meaning of their miserable existence. So much for socially responsible behavior. Too bad that President Obama doesn’t have the good sense to charge this modern-day pack of miscreants with treason. These are the sort that only Benedict Arnold could love.

Meanwhile, they can bask in the glow of globalism, an effort to justify the behavior of sociopaths. Believe me, these kids from India aren’t paying the bill. Multinational corporations are.

September 30, 2008

Financial Collapse: Fear & National Resentment

monetary whirlpool

monetary whirlpool

Global reports state that the global credit crisis has deepened. Banks have stopped lending to one another. Britain and Europe are encountering many of the same problems as the United States. Central bankers are dumping cash onto the market and playing the same game as the Federal Reserve through auctions to keep commercial banks on life support. Who is to blame? Today, the blame is being cast on the collapse of Lehman Brothers, but the reality is a tragic loss of confidence brought on by bankers themselves. Some of the best educated men and women on the planet have been powerless to improve the situation.

Commercial bankers have locked up the market and the only option central bankers think they have is to dump money into banks, in effect, satisfying the “need for cash.” The need for cash and credit is a symptom of the larger problem: panic by bankers because of their poor choices.

Economists publicly expect the longest recession in a quarter century with or without a bailout plan to rescue the battered banking industry. Most say the next six months are going to be very difficult. Market scare tactics say that if a bailout is not approved, a depression is likely as credit freezes up and markets collapse. The global consortium of central banks dumped an additional $630 billion into the global financial system, which will fuel both inflation and devalue currencies simultaneously. Central bankers are doing the same thing with other major currencies, portending a global debacle in an effort to keep the cash and credit flowing. On the other hand, the central bankers don’t want to be caught holding devalued cash, so now is the time to cleanse their palates. Central bankers only collect and horde gold among themselves since that is how they settle their accounts against each other.

stormy economic skies

stormy economic skies

Whether disaster can be averted or not, the United States has a right to do nothing, even to fail. The reality is that this is already what has happened as politicians and money managers stubbornly cling to the hope of sustaining what currently exists in the current power structure. The problem remains as a global crisis that even central bankers are ill-prepared to deal with.

George Bush warned Congress that they must act or damage to the U.S. economy will be painful and lasting. Congress seems to have rejected that notion. What the nation really has is a credibility crisis. Authorities seem to be more interested in their reputations than possible solutions. Meanwhile, many American scrimpers and savers are in a panic and most American voters resent the bailout efforts, convinced that the rescue effort is for the good of Wall Street and not the average man in America. Considering the decline in the U.S. living standard over the last few decades, the popular opinion to let banks fail and allow the system to unwind naturally is seen as likely to have little effect on meaningful personal assets in the eyes of most Americans. The real problem that panics bankers and politicians lies in the market correction and pricing standards in a bankrupt economy as values fall through the floor, creating still more bankruptcy and poverty for business and citizens.

The correction in the U.S. housing market bore a decline of more than 16 percent in July 2008 alone as the accounting totals have come rolling in. Americans are quickly becoming “upside-down” on mortgages on their homes, encouraging more defaults and foreclosures, even as more Americans lose their employment from an already failing economy.

The public line is that business must have a huge amounts of credit available. Business, like consumers have become increasingly dependent on credit while overpaying executives and paying stockholders instead of reinvesting in themselves. With credit becoming increasingly tight, businesses may find it tough to obtain short-term loans to meet payrolls or purchase inventory. That may lead to job layoffs, which could ripple through the economy in a matter of weeks. The bottom line is that solvent businesses do not need large amounts of credit for everyday business. In the “old days,” business used to borrow for expansion purposes only. Business needs were met by the influx of cash coming in from clients and customers. Have business standards declined so dramatically in the name of personal profit taking or is this statement simply a political red herring to generate urgency?

Increasingly, Americans have become more and more detached from the wealth and prosperity of Corporate and Political America. They have become beasts of burden for the affluent. Considering the circumstances, it isn’t hard to see why many Americans don’t favor a bailout, even if they risk losing a few thousand in a retirement account they may never see anyway. There is an underground pessimism and resentment that has come to rest in much of mainstream America. ~ E. Manning

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