Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

October 9, 2010

World economy breaking with US

As the US economy teeters on the edge of decline and a double dip recession, emerging economies continue to grow at a fast pace, fueled by multinational corporations. This changing global economy reveals a United States that is not the center of the economic world.

Financial leaders have joined hands to decide how to boost the global economy at the annual IMF and World Bank meeting. A number of these financial leaders suggest a break up, what is known as a “de-coupling”, in the wings for a number of years, but gaining traction as the US economy stagnates. Central bankers, along with complicit US politicians, have rode the US horse into the ground and now have their eyes on the next rising star to enhance their prosperity. Most politicians advertise that the US will live forever, even though powerhouse nations through history have ebbed like the tidal flow.

The world is breaking away from the US as the consumer of last resort,” said analyst Edward Harrison, the founder of CreditWriteDowns.com. “You’ll see a lot more importance in China, in Russia.” Corporate multinationals and US politicians have raided the US economy over the last thirty years and put that stock in other economies like China, Brazil, Russia and India in the name of globalism. The view is that growth in the global economy will be much more dependent upon these countries than on the “developed economies.” Whether this is true or not remains to be seen.

Meanwhile, the US continues to run by idiot lawmakers that are afraid of multinational corporate power or are having their pockets lined behind the scenes. Like the old Roman Empire, the US seems bent on its’ own self-destruction to salve the interests of a few “leaders of men.”

April 9, 2008

Fed: Global Economic Outlook

Filed under: banking, central bank, federal reserve, investment, money — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 2:32 am

In the major advanced foreign economies, the growth rate of gross domestic product declined in the fourth quarter. The source of the slowdown has varied substantially across economies. In the Euro area and in the United Kingdom, output was restrained by a softening in domestic demand. In contrast, Canadian domestic demand continued to increase at a very strong pace, but because of an offsetting steep decline in net exports, real GDP rose only modestly. Japan was the exception among the advanced foreign economies to the pattern of slower growth; real GDP there strengthened in the fourth quarter with higher domestic spending and continued strength in exports.

Early first-quarter economic indicators for advanced foreign economies pointed to slowing growth. Growth slowed a bit in emerging markets, though it continued to advance at a fairly strong rate. In emerging Asia, the pace of real GDP growth picked up in the fourth quarter in China and South Korea, but it softened in most other countries. The rate of increase in economic activity slowed in Brazil, Mexico, and several other countries in Latin America in the fourth quarter, but remained generally strong.

The outlook for the United States is seen as negative and fragile. The Fed reported problems of declining asset values, credit losses, and strained financial market conditions could be quite persistent, restraining credit availability and economic activity, delaying and dampening economic recovery.

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