Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

January 9, 2009

A TARP Bailout Program for Consumers?

furrowed political brows

furrowed political brows

The failed U.S. TARP bailout program legislated by the EESA last year has been ungoing review by the Obama Ascension Team and the likes of Treasury Secretary-elect Timothy Geithner, former Fed member and sycophant. Furrowed brows and eye bags have become a way of life in politics. Managing the program has become an impossible and failed task. President Obama will be responsible for determining what to do with the remaining unspent TARP funds. The Obama Team is examining ways to expand the government program to generate loans to municipalities, small businesses and consumers.

Many in Congress seem to agree that the existing government program should be revamped rather than refunded. Many elected officials agree that the remaining money should be used to stop the national foreclosure crisis instead of a continuation of current policy where Wall Street firms receive continued assistance to pay bonuses to executives and dividends to shareholders as promoted by the Bush administration.

monopoly-moneyAs if the U.S. needs yet more government agencies, Geithner is considering creating a new bureau within Treasury to oversee the existing TARP funds. Adding oversight personnel to government measures has proved to be a failed premise, especially since any provision lags far behind the need. Any potential for work backs up due to lack of staffing, if staffing is ultimately provided over the long haul. Such provisions are more like a governmental agency employment and monetary ponzi scheme than professional organization. So far, overseeing TARP funds has been a disaster, largely made secret because of banking bailouts.

Meanwhile, banks in Britain are laying off staff while bringing malleable interns into the fold as underpaid and temporary junior staff, a move that could catch on in the United States: a cost-saving and control-oriented corporate move that has been all the rage outside of banking. British banks are counting on business picking up after the recession, rationalizing that young blood needs to be on tap for the occasion. Swiss-owned banks are notorious for this practice.

be an intern

be an intern

Corporate America has caused the economic crisis and now that they have been bailed out with taxpayer money, are seeking to continue to take advantage of people with the damage they have caused. Government seems to back up this thinking, which is ultimately destructive rather than constructive. Self-serving behavior continues unabated in government and corporate life. Now that truly is worldly wisdom at its’ worst. Anyone that chose to run personal finances in the same way wouldn’t last long, hence the benefits of corporate/governmental leveraging and power borrowed from the taxpayer.

Whether the American taxpayer can possibly benefit from all the confusion remains to be seen. ~ E. Manning

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September 17, 2008

Bailout Fever Strikes U.S. Again

The world of insurance will never be the same. AIG, a major insurance corporation and the world’s largest insurer has averted the worst financial collapse in history by accepting an $85 billion Federal Reserve loan and giving the government a majority stake in the company. The U.S. Treasury was fearful of a “disorderly failure” that would lead to larger national failures.

American International Group was a wild card with failure creating an enormous and unknown measure of system risk to the entire economy. The federal government gets 79.9 percent take of the firm and senior managers give up their jobs.

panic on the street

panic on the street

Meanwhile, the Federal Reserve loan with a 2-year term will allow AIG (in theory) to divest itself of assets in a timely manner without creating an immediate crisis. Stockholders have been effectively squeezed out and are subject to losing any dividends.

AIG was huge in the credit default market, insuring contract guarantees that companies would not fail in large financial deals. A default contract buys protection against the threat of default by a company, municipality or a package of debt backed by mortgages. A buyer pays the seller a premium over a set term. The seller pays out if the default occurs. Defaults on mortgages and securitized bonds brought AIG to the verge of oblivion.

The complexity and global reach is huge, likely affecting every fund on the market in one fell swoop. Even with the loan in place to protect AIG for the short-term, Wall Street is reeling from the effects. A future bankruptcy would also play havoc on business contracts. There are reports that people are hording cash. Derivatives have been a highly profitable on Wall Street until now. The financial world is changing quickly as repercussions from the subprime mortgage crisis ripple across the globe.

~ E. Manning

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