Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

April 12, 2010

Multinational America & Cheap Labor

Even highly educated Americans can hardly win with a nationwide crisis of underemployed and unemployed. Clearly, America lives in the age of the wage slave, a time of mindlessness and lack of creativity. Corporate America remains addicted to outsourcing overseas, especially where cheap Indian labor is concerned. Now globalist academia, notably the University of Houston, is outsourcing teaching assistant jobs to India. Globalists are doing much more than that. Even Houston is a new center of foreign training basking in the warmth of  globalist conceit. Meanwhile, Bill Gates vis-à-vis Microsoft, has continued to sack the prospect of American jobs by sending them overseas. Since Gates can’t bring Indian help legally into America by the truckload, he is sending precious jobs overseas at a time when an unprecedented number of qualified educated Americans are out of work. Almost half of the those on the unemployed rosters have been out of work for more than six months. It seems to me that the time is nigh to outsource the national sociopaths.

It is high time to move away from the falsehood of corporate globalism to consider employing educated U.S. citizens. Having experience myself in dealing with teams of the hired from Mumbai, I must admit that they seem to be bright people on the surface. They are humble and do what they are told. Hell yes, they are eager to please! That is where the panacea ends folks! You will tell them again and again, yes… and again. You will spend hours in special conference calls dealing with “the meeting of the minds,” as they continue to pour out work that most children can do.

Multinationals: your jobs building another nation.

The communication and cultural barrier looms large as work is redone over and over. As far as being eager to please, this is hardly a surprise since corporate buildings spring from some of the worst slums of India, corporate neighbors that gleam in contrast to some of the worst ghettos the world will see. Who wants to leave a pretty polished office in favor of a human black-hole of mud and cardboard? It is time to fully realize that this is a human rights issue. Elevating foreigners that live in mud holes seems to be the human thing to do, unless you are merely elevating them to the underpaid wage-slave status as they fight in their minds about what the hell is in the minds and attitudes of managers in Corporate America. Surely “Bob Cratchit” had it no better and we have the nerve to think that globalism is doing them a favor, kind of like how imperial Britain was good for India too.

Meanwhile, the good boys and girls at Deloitte, Price Waterhouse , Microsoft, IBM and the whole lot of lousy multinational sleezoids continue to undermine and use an entire planet of human beings for what is good for corporate needs at the moment while basking in the glow of sustainability and green politics. You can add all of Wall Street and their overseas markets to the list too because this behavior is all the same thing.

Behind the corporate scenes in India, destined for a third world U.S.A.

That isn’t enough for “Multinational America.” This well-funded, organized racket is built on lies of an American labor shortage that oozes from ivy league “innovation.” They have legitimized the crime of selling out “spoiled Americans” in the hope of instilling and importing India’s caste system into the United States for their own benefit. They are debasing the nation so they can continue to ply their usury on the nation as they pimp globalism to proffer their bottom line and the meaning of their miserable existence. So much for socially responsible behavior. Too bad that President Obama doesn’t have the good sense to charge this modern-day pack of miscreants with treason. These are the sort that only Benedict Arnold could love.

Meanwhile, they can bask in the glow of globalism, an effort to justify the behavior of sociopaths. Believe me, these kids from India aren’t paying the bill. Multinational corporations are.

May 8, 2009

The New Brand of Corporatism: Unemployment

unemployedThe fruits of the ‘new brand’ of corporatism have squarely placed the nation and world where it is today. Corporate cheerleaders and government experts are now combining forces to create a new outlook that fully accepts policy of the last few decades. For many decades, government has quietly adjusted record keeping to massage public statistics.  Once again, corporatism and a fully complicit government is seeking to adjust the future of the United States by redefining full employment. This vanity seeks to install the idea that we don’t need economic health or reasonable employment to enjoy record profits or the ideal of prosperity. If we can’t have prosperity the way the leaders of corporatism want, they will simply redefine that definition of prosperity to fit their own mold while continuing to blow their own horns.

The experts want the nation to bite off on the notion that “post-recession America” will be stressed with high unemployment even after the good times return. Good times for who? Obviously, the outlook of good times without a sizable portion of the United States participating involves only the outlook of corporate bodies and the capability of maintaining or promoting profits for the structure of the current system in place. The economy of the whole of the nation isn’t being considered, at least not realistically.

unemployment4Millions of jobs have vanished forever. Most will find it harder than ever to get hired again. The idea is being promoted that we will be required to accept lower earnings and a diminished economic role in the country as the rich get richer and the poor and disenfranchised fall off the economic map and into government assistance. As it stands approximately 54% of America that is employed is paying for the rest of America’s unemployed, disabled, retired and imprisoned.

unemployed1The ‘new brand’ of corporatism considers that employment has nothing to do with economic prosperity. Politicians and ‘economic corporatists’ console themselves and hopefully the populace by stating that the natural rate of unemployment neither accelerates or decelerates inflation.  They want us to accept a markedly higher ‘natural rate’ of unemployment by disassociating employment from the economy.

All this is drizzled by the news media with the admission that there is no relief in sight for the unemployed. By the admission of many, like Laurence Ball, it will be a long time before the nation sees 5 percent unemployment rates.

Then the media fully deploys the most heinous part of the corporate plan. The more time that workers spend without a job, the less attractive they become. Why? Ostensibly because the unemployed are not keeping up with ‘new technology’. This skewed outlook of corporatism is expected to keep the unemployment rate elevated. In the same breath, the experts say that the unemployed become discouraged and change lifestyle. Corporatism has dealt America a very nasty blow indeed and isn’t finished yet. Should Americans continue to bite off on the same old political and social wisdom of the past? We have a right and the privilege to reinvent ourselves. I encourage you to get on the road to reinventing yourself and standing on your own two feet without being dependent on corporatism. Otherwise, you have very little to look forward to beyond spending endless amounts of cash on dubious college training to continue to tickle corporatism’s insane fancies. ~ E. Manning

January 27, 2009

Obama: When is a Stimulus not a Stimulus?

barack-and-energyWhen is a U.S. government stimulus not a stimulus? The latest rendition of the $825 billion economic stimulus plan won’t be spent very quickly for what President Obama has specified to the American public. What do I mean? The Congressional Business Office released data that suggests that it will take longer than expected to boost the economy. Why? The government wouldn’t be able to spend at least one-fourth of a proposed $825 billion economic stimulus plan until after 2010. Even then, only about 12% of the stimulus is actually being used for stimulus.

According to the preliminary report, the government would spend about $26 billion of the money this year and $110 billion in 2010. $103 billion would be spent in 2011, $53 billion would be spent in 2012 and $63 billion between 2013 and 2019. That is stretching the total stimulus plan for a decade.

Wouldn’t you like to see the report for yourself? Now that the details have seen the light of scrutiny, those wonderful PDF files that American taxpayers have paid for have been rendered unavailable in a similar fashion to the EESA budget details in 2008.

The Obama administration said $3 of every $4 in the package should be spent within 18 months to have maximum impact on jobs and taxpayers.

• Less than $5 billion of the $30 billion set aside for highway spending would be spent within the next two years, the CBO said.

• Only $26 billion out of $274 billion in infrastructure spending would be delivered into the economy by the Sept. 30 end of the budget year, just 7 percent.

• Just one in seven dollars of a huge $18.5 billion investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy programs would be spent within a year and a half.

• About $907 million of a $6 billion plan to expand broadband access in rural and other under-served areas would be spent by 2011.

• Just one-fourth of clean drinking water projects can be completed by October of next year.

• $275 billion worth of tax cuts to 95 percent of filers and a huge infusion of help for state governments is to be distributed into the economy on an uncertain time line.

What is the stimulus really for?

• The House stimulus bill includes an extra $87 billion in federal aid to state Medicaid programs.

• It allots some $120 billion to boost state and city education programs.

• There’s $4 billion for state and local anti-crime initiatives in the legislation, not to mention $30-plus billion for highways and other infrastructure projects.

• $6.9 billion to help state and local governments make investments that make them more energy efficient and reduce carbon emissions.

• $87 billion to states, increasing through the end of FY 2010 the share of Medicaid costs the Federal government reimburses all states by 4.8 percent, with extra relief tied to rates of unemployment.

• $120 billion to states and school districts to stabilize budgets and prevent tax increases and deep cuts to critical education programs.

Overall, about one-quarter of the entire $825 billion recovery package would be devoted to activities crucial to governors, mayors, and local school boards. Out of 157 items, 117 have nothing to do with job production or employment/economic stimulus per Representative Mark Kirk.

The bottom line is that the latest stimulus plan is not an economic stimulus plan at all, but rather a bailout for government entities and federal programs. Most of the stimulus money that has been planned to be spent this year is not for economic stimulus at all. The nation needs more economic “energy” put in the right places if we are going to spend the money at all. ~ E. Manning

January 11, 2009

Unemployment: Is Obama’s Stimulus Enough?

unemployment-officeBarack Obama has projected that his future economic stimulus plan will create nearly 3.7 million jobs by the end of 2010, mainly in construction, leisure services and manufacturing. His plan is supposed to lower the unemployment rate by 1.8% by 2010. Yet, most intelligent Americans and experts alike see plenty of hard times ahead.
read complete article at TNTalk!

Unemployment: Jiggering with Accounting

September 25, 2007

Fed Discusses U.S. Competitiveness Concerns

Filed under: banking, federal reserve, government, money, politics — Tags: , , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 10:20 am

Bernanke discusses the importance of education and training for the global labor market. I hold that as a nation, we do entirely too little to train and retrain workers in this country. The Bush Administration and previous administrations would rather give money away than retrain or actively assist workers in employment efforts to keep the economy and gross national product strong. Bernanke is very mild is expressing the true need for training, instead emphasizing higher education as an earmark for success.

“Ongoing globalization of economic activity will also lead to continuing changes in the structure of the U.S. economy–including the composition of our output of both goods and services, and thus the structure of our labor force. The world economy is benefiting from the expansion of trade and the rising productivity of countries abroad that are making great strides expanding both their infrastructure and the educational attainment of their workforces. That can be good for them, and for us. Importantly, our ability to reap the benefits of globalization will depend on the flexibility of our labor force to adapt to changes in job opportunities, in part by investing in the education and training necessary to meet the new demands (Bernanke, 2004).”
~ Chairman Ben S. Bernanke at the U.S. Chamber Education and Workforce Summit, Washington, D.C. on September 24, 2007

Education and Economic Competitiveness

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