Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

October 21, 2008

Global Financial Overhaul Recommended

A new form of capitalism is needed, based on values which put finance at the service of business and citizens, and not vice versa,” Nicolaus Sarkozy told leaders at an EU economic summit today. “The system must be completely overhauled, an overhaul that must be global.”

Now the Great Depression of America is being used as the classic example of economic failure, even though that crisis was focused in the United States. That is not the case this time. Toxic banking instruments have turned the world on its collective ear. This articulated radical overhaul undoubtedly will involve the relatively new digital economy with all kinds of security and financial protections in the name serving global citizens. In fact, the digital economy has become the de facto global economy, connecting the world as a singular body of people for information, global data sharing and ecommerce. Authorities just haven’t arrived at the global genesis of the New World Order of Finance and Government.

Authorities want global stability as well as financial security. Finance Ministers and Government leaders are looking for a new way to bring that possibility into reality. You should watch the financial accord overseas very closely, especially as the United States is brought increasingly into the picture. Central bankers as the main recipients of the ultimate solution have everything to gain and nothing to lose, creating a new global empire of power and wealth, even if it does take some time. ~ E. Manning

October 12, 2008

International Bankers: Time is Short

the IMF in better times

the IMF in better times

The International Monetary Fund, an international organization that oversees the global financial system based on economic policies of its member countries, proclaimed that time is short for consensus on the international financial crisis. The finance members of industrialized nations failed to agree on absolute and unified measures to end the crisis. The IMF expects a systemic meltdown if stability in financial markets is not achieved. While the international body recommends “exceptional vigilance, coordination and readiness to take bold action,” the body is leaving the pressure and responsibility on the collective bodies of national Finance Ministers. All this from an international body that claimed in August that there would be no recession in the Eurozone.

Solvency concerns are cited as the chief concern. The reality is that solvency is determined by a set of regulations that can easy be changed, as has happened in the United States. Therefore, the definition of solvency to a reasonable extent is in the hands of Finance Ministers and national leaders. Where such a change is seen as beneficial, such a move buys time when developing a consensus is especially important.

While consensus has been difficult, developing effective means to counteract the global financial crisis has been no less elusive. Panicked Finance Ministers are looking for support from the IMF or other global authorities in a effort to deal with the crisis. Britain has developed an interbank lending guarantee that has other nations stressing to compete.

In general, G-7 and G-20 ideas are essentially the same and somewhat short on creativity. Whether injecting capital into financial institutions and insurance companies, effectively nationalizing them, or buying up worthless mortgage assets, groups of Finance Ministers are chiefly examining the importance of uniform national guarantees to protect individual economies and to avoid creating a currency run. Encouraging monetary liquidity through central banking auctions has become a mainstay in prime economies.

Most telling perhaps is a statement made by the Brazilian Finance Minister, Guido Mangega, “The problems we are facing today in the global economy must be solved by several countries, they can’t be addressed by only one country or a single continent.” Finance Minsters from the G-20, not wishing to be left out of the loop, want emerging economies to be included within the ranks of G-7 Finance Ministers or by implication, involved as part of a larger authoritarian body.

Even Arab nations, whose prosperity seemed to make them immune from catastrophe are now encountering monetary issues, property value declines and business funding problems that threaten the Arab economic fabric as in much of the world. The Arab nations are largely isolated within the Islamic banking community except from within the burgeoning oil market, which in recent years has fueled inflation rates as high as 25 per cent.

As a result of the growing crisis, the United States is seen on many fronts, notably among Muslim leaders, as having no credibility whatever. Resentment, which is already high in religious circles, is multiplying because of the perception of financial betrayal and lack of wisdom. The push for Islamic banking within Muslim circles will continue despite any devaluation of the dollar experienced.

The issue created by injecting capital into banks dilutes monetary value and ownership of individual banks. While these types of measure can create the appearance of stability, diluting monetary value creates an ongoing increase in national, as well as global inflation. With increases in credit and cash generated for financial rescues, the end result is always inflationary as the devaluation of currency sets in. The only short-term winners are holding the gold and living off the interest for their services: central bankers. Meanwhile, central banking policies are behind the continued growth in inflation because a flawed economic model that mandates liquidity through monetary production. This is currently central banking’s best hope for economic stability. ~ E. Manning

October 10, 2008

Dollar Rally Due to Global Inflation?

safe haven again?

safe haven again?

The U.S. dollar is once again holding its status as a safe haven because of deteriorating economic outlooks in the global economy and increases in inflation overseas. The recent adjustment in oil prices is due to the leveling effect that inflation is having on economies coupled with recent U.S. government intervention in commodities futures.

The crisis in Iceland, Britain and much of Europe and Asia has electrified the so-called G-7 Finance Ministers to meet to decide on unified actions and strategies to bolster sagging economies.  Iceland refused to stand behind their failed banking system, resulting in large losses to British depositors. Prime Minister Gordon Brown has frozen the assets of Iceland in Britain to insure that losses by British depositors are covered as much as possible. The European Central Bank has also summarized the idea that recent exchange rate imbalances are due to the current financial crisis. Globally, banks are becoming more imperiled as the system locks down due to financial fears and the unknown effect of bad securities globally.

The general consensus is that the goal of the G-7 meeting must be to promote liquidity and growth. Those kind of financial moves dilute monetary systems and boost inflation. Even so, inflation is considered as a back door issue. Today, only stability is king. ~ E. Manning

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