Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

October 6, 2008

Crisis Floods Global Markets

not all love bailouts

not all love bailouts

Governments and central banks around the world grasped at measures to contain the fast-spreading financial crisis today. Investor confidence reflected on global stocks. According to the media, investors have finally decided that a recession is inevitable.

The more powerful members of the EU have reacted in panic as market volatility continues. Similar events continue to unveil with bailouts in the works. Even Fortis has new ownership. In panic, central bankers are dumping billions of euros on the market, creating another global monetary inflation hazard. A few national banks throughout the EU have moved to guarantee depositor funds causing a rash of capital movement to guaranteed banks and undermining financial security for others. More European governments followed Germany’s lead offering guarantees to savers in a frantic effort to calm fears among investors over the worst financial crisis in 80 years. The big losers portend to be the shareholders of these institutions.

economic bondage

economic bondage

The British government has promised on Monday to protect citizens in the face of global financial turmoil. Investors are terrified that the government will require partial ownership in exchange for the bailout.

For more than a week, the U.S. Federal Reserve has been working to find new ownership and capital to cover to bankrupt Wachovia Bank, even issuing and quickly retracting their statements as deals have fallen through. Right now, the Fed is trying to coax Citigroup and Wells Fargo to break up the Wachovia’s assets. Even the Fed is learning to temper its enthusiasm as deals are worked out.

While none of this is especially good news on the surface, the really bad news remains the now unseen seeds planted by central bankers as they flood the market with euros or whatever monetary unit is seen as useful. This simply weakens an already weak economy and further dilutes the value of the currency, creating more inflationary pressure.

The really bad news behind all of this news is that the United States bailout success hinges so much on foreign investment from overseas. With a global crisis in the works, only the Muslim and Saudi countries are not yet reporting huge problems beyond apparent hyperinflation caused by the huge $700 billion yearly influx of greenbacks from America. They have so many devalued dollars that spending them is a challenge. Therein lies the crux of the problem. A vicious circle of events is creating a downward global spiral that cannot be readily or quickly overcome without a reinvention or substantial revision of a new monetary system, an idea that is reportedly in discussion by the International Society of Bankers (the global central banking franchises) as an easier way out of the looming crisis if events become unmanageable. ~ E. Manning

October 3, 2008

E.U. Panic: the Edge of the Abyss

Interbank lending, credit to businesses and individuals have seized up. Central banks have injected billions of dollars to maintain some flow of funds, endangering the stability of the dollar.

French Prime Minister Francois Fillon is hosting an emergency summit with Italian, British and German leaders on October 4. Fillon claims that only collective action are capable of solving the financial crisis facing the European Union. He said he would not rule out any solution to stop the failure of the banking system.

Lax regulation and excessive lending have to a global debacle placing the world “on the edge of the abyss because of an irresponsible system,” according to the French Minister.

Finance Ministers in Europe will be working on proposals at the emergency meeting to unfreeze credit while coordinating economic and monetary strategies. While the U.S. has been focused on a massive bailout plan, the British government has been panicking in an effort to bolster their financial system. Bad news isn’t limited to the U.S. economy, now residing in the E.U. financial sector.

Ireland has offered guarantees on bank deposits, prompting a flight of capital from British lenders to Irish banks. Insurance giant Fortis has been broken up and nationalized to sustain it since no corporate rescuers were available. Swiss UBS has been plastered by its exposure to subprime debt. The banking and investment industry in Europe is shedding jobs. Meanwhile, turmoil over Ireland’s guarantees threatens the stability of the rest of Union according to many banking officials.

The U.S. economy has become thoroughly dependant on foreign investment. With much of the world is financial disarray, who will invest in America? According to authors of the American bailout plan, the plan is largely dependent on foreign investors to insure the success for the future. Otherwise, U.S. success in preventing a protracted deep recession is truly a wild card. ~ E. Manning

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