Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

July 26, 2010

Plague of Home Foreclosures in U.S. Continues

The miraculous recovery that has been proffered by the Banking Elite hasn’t happened. Central Bankers and Wall Street profiteers believed that they could continue to operate with wild speculation while reaping the results and encouraging more of the same. The financial wizards have not proved their financial literacy. Their speculative downfall started with bundling speculative instruments tied to U.S. housing debt that never should have happened to begin with. Hundreds of thousands, maybe millions, of Americans bought homes that never really qualified. The hot market was bolstered until the superheated financial bubble burst, leaving a worldwide recession based on what amounts to Wall Street gambling on highly leveraged contracts that have bankrupted the system. The reality is that the problem isn’t with foreclosures themselves, but with the bundled securities and expected profits that are tied to the failing mortgages. No doubt, these securities have been packaged and sold dozens of times even though they are worth nothing now.

More than three years into a U.S. housing crisis that started a worldwide recession, home foreclosures continue to further the devaluation of the U.S. economy. The waves of foreclosures no longer come from sub-prime loans that have defaulted. Foreclosures come from formerly respectable borrowers that have lost their jobs in an impoverished and drained economy that no functions to support a nation of hard-working Americans, but functions only to serve the Banking Elite.

In the first half of 2010, more than 1.6 million U.S. properties are in the midst of foreclosure filings, which include bank repossessions, default notices and auction sale notices. This is an 8 percent increase from the first half of 2009 which puts the United States on target to reach 3 million filings this year. These numbers show the fragile state of housing and real estate investment, which has been decimated. Government programs have been ineffective at stopping the national hemorrhage. Little has changed except that more Americans are living in rentals, with friends and family, in tents or on the streets, depending on their financial fortunes.

The U.S. government and banking profiteers built a house of cards on the idea that the cost of housing would always rise and that the profits would never cease. After massive bailouts, they are still stuck without a financial course to chart and exploit, beyond tapping government bailouts. The Federal Reserve holds trillions in useless notes and obligations in the hope that someday they will be worth more than the paper they are printed on. The economy continues to spiral downward despite limited attempts by big money multinationals to bolster the market.

Corporate multinationals and banking bigshots aren’t here as charities. They demand to make money for shareholders. For decades they have profited from U.S. tax law and from the backs of manufacturing slaves in the third-world. Now they seek to hold the bottom line and to keep their organizations alive. Now they are cannibalizing inept governments to sustain themselves. Stagnation is preferable to loss as the United States becomes the new third-world in their great plan to level the national playing field through globalization. Welcome to the brave new world of globalism, where everyone is equal except for the corporate oligarchy.

It isn’t pretty, but is pretty much as advertised.

April 9, 2008

Fed: Global Economic Outlook

Filed under: banking, central bank, federal reserve, investment, money — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 2:32 am

In the major advanced foreign economies, the growth rate of gross domestic product declined in the fourth quarter. The source of the slowdown has varied substantially across economies. In the Euro area and in the United Kingdom, output was restrained by a softening in domestic demand. In contrast, Canadian domestic demand continued to increase at a very strong pace, but because of an offsetting steep decline in net exports, real GDP rose only modestly. Japan was the exception among the advanced foreign economies to the pattern of slower growth; real GDP there strengthened in the fourth quarter with higher domestic spending and continued strength in exports.

Early first-quarter economic indicators for advanced foreign economies pointed to slowing growth. Growth slowed a bit in emerging markets, though it continued to advance at a fairly strong rate. In emerging Asia, the pace of real GDP growth picked up in the fourth quarter in China and South Korea, but it softened in most other countries. The rate of increase in economic activity slowed in Brazil, Mexico, and several other countries in Latin America in the fourth quarter, but remained generally strong.

The outlook for the United States is seen as negative and fragile. The Fed reported problems of declining asset values, credit losses, and strained financial market conditions could be quite persistent, restraining credit availability and economic activity, delaying and dampening economic recovery.

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