Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

July 11, 2010

Recession: The Ol’ Double Dip?

What is happening in the U.S. economy? The  newborn atmosphere of a slow recovery has plummeted since the start of the year when financial agencies were debating when to announce an interest rate increase. That is no longer the case.

The tax credit for first-time home buyers for up to $8,000 was over in April. Since then, housing transactions have nearly vanished. The mortgage loan interest rate has fallen to historic lows. The economic upturn that authorities claimed earlier this year simply the result of economic stimulus measures by the United States government.

Events are just as somber outside of the United States. From all appearances, a $1 trillion relief package ended the financial crisis that hit Europe. Still there is not a sign of recovery. Germany provided the needed stimulus funds, but is no longer providing capital to keep failed economies that have squandered credit with bankers solvent. Efforts to revive the economy have resulted only in more loss as bankers continue to plunder with their derivative cons. The U.S. has been fearful of making changes for the banking and finance community. Central bankers are still in charge, printing dollars as if there were no tomorrow.

Job are gone in the United States, likely forever. This is the admission of VP Joe Biden a little more than a week ago. States are looking at emergency measures to see what they can do to avoid the bleeding of jobs to other lands and to other peoples. Arizona is due to begin enforcement of a controversial immigration policy that is designed to return employment back to Arizona residents since measures by the federal government have been lackluster to non-existent in many places. The nation is full of illegals, the exact number unknown.

The price of a global economy is likely to be high. Every economy is subject to bring another one down. No one has discovered a way to move out of the doldrums. $787 billion in the U.S. was designed to boost domestic consumption, but the market is still cold. Congress has moved to bolster the economy through The Buy American Act, a ancient law passed in 1933 that requires the suppliers of the government to use American made products. Lawmakers are afraid to close tax loopholes that have remained open for corporations since 1991. As a result, nothing changes.

This has cooled temporary benefits of trade by corporations in the U.S.  known as the trade deficit. Corporations don’t care about this public denuding of wealth. They simply look to their own profits, not a sustainable relationship over time. Politicians outside of the U.S. want to promote free trade, as if the United States has more to offer in this regard. Even during the recession, the States were the primary agent of consumption for the world. Reckless spending, careless law and the rise of the corporate oligarchy has resulted in a new world, with a more level playing field. That is, after all, what globalists have wanted. This means that the big players that the globe depended on for economic sustenance are no longer the powerhouses they once were.

The nation is in an economic quagmire because it has ceded its wealth to corporations, a.k.a. multinationals and central bankers. The common opinion is that nations should not try to survive at the expense of other nations. Even so, the reality is that this has always been the case. The homogenized sameness of global balance supports only those that are in place to take advantage of it. The majority of the world will suffer at the hand those few that won’t. What’s new about that? It’s simply more political pandering that benefits a few.

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October 6, 2008

Crisis Floods Global Markets

not all love bailouts

not all love bailouts

Governments and central banks around the world grasped at measures to contain the fast-spreading financial crisis today. Investor confidence reflected on global stocks. According to the media, investors have finally decided that a recession is inevitable.

The more powerful members of the EU have reacted in panic as market volatility continues. Similar events continue to unveil with bailouts in the works. Even Fortis has new ownership. In panic, central bankers are dumping billions of euros on the market, creating another global monetary inflation hazard. A few national banks throughout the EU have moved to guarantee depositor funds causing a rash of capital movement to guaranteed banks and undermining financial security for others. More European governments followed Germany’s lead offering guarantees to savers in a frantic effort to calm fears among investors over the worst financial crisis in 80 years. The big losers portend to be the shareholders of these institutions.

economic bondage

economic bondage

The British government has promised on Monday to protect citizens in the face of global financial turmoil. Investors are terrified that the government will require partial ownership in exchange for the bailout.

For more than a week, the U.S. Federal Reserve has been working to find new ownership and capital to cover to bankrupt Wachovia Bank, even issuing and quickly retracting their statements as deals have fallen through. Right now, the Fed is trying to coax Citigroup and Wells Fargo to break up the Wachovia’s assets. Even the Fed is learning to temper its enthusiasm as deals are worked out.

While none of this is especially good news on the surface, the really bad news remains the now unseen seeds planted by central bankers as they flood the market with euros or whatever monetary unit is seen as useful. This simply weakens an already weak economy and further dilutes the value of the currency, creating more inflationary pressure.

The really bad news behind all of this news is that the United States bailout success hinges so much on foreign investment from overseas. With a global crisis in the works, only the Muslim and Saudi countries are not yet reporting huge problems beyond apparent hyperinflation caused by the huge $700 billion yearly influx of greenbacks from America. They have so many devalued dollars that spending them is a challenge. Therein lies the crux of the problem. A vicious circle of events is creating a downward global spiral that cannot be readily or quickly overcome without a reinvention or substantial revision of a new monetary system, an idea that is reportedly in discussion by the International Society of Bankers (the global central banking franchises) as an easier way out of the looming crisis if events become unmanageable. ~ E. Manning

July 31, 2008

Creation of Wheelbarrow Money

Wheelbarrow money isn’t just a figment of the past or in the annals of German history. It is real and today, just not in the United States. On the other hand, the little nation of Zimbabwe is reorganizing its money in an attempt to meet its outrageous 2,200,000% inflation rate. Obviously, the crazy percentage relates to older and better times.

Last week Zimbabwe released $100 billion notes in a meager attempt to fight the inflationary wheelbarrow syndrome. The day the new banknote hit the streets wasn’t enough to buy a loaf of bread. Today, the new bank note won’t cover that. Inflation has already eroded the value. Now a loaf of bread is $200 billion and if a Zimbabwe citizens longs for a can of Coke, that is a mere $600 billion. Zimbabwe is cutting ten zeros from its currency making $10 billion a revalued one dollar. In headier times, Zimbabwe was the toast of the third-world town.

The problem isn’t over. Inflation is so rampant, monetary units are expected to change again in the near future. Interestingly, just six months ago, this writer heard comparisons of Zimbabwe’s central banking policy to Ben Bernanke’s Federal Reserve of U.S. origin. Naturally, there are plenty of differences, notably that Zimbabwe is certainly not America. The overspending habits, however, are very much alike.

What the pundits say, there are similarities and the fact remains that no single economy is immune from inflation, especially when money policy and overspending is largely ignored. Could it be possible that a wheelbarrow of dollars could be required to buy a loaf of bread? It happened in Germany and if we keep ignoring common sense, nothing is impossible. Taking wealth for granted through fraudulent spending is a dangerous policy.

Debt, like the U.S. national debt, doesn’t go away, unless of course, the United Nations collects donations from larger economies to make that happen. Strangely, while this plan is part of U.N. policy creativity and wishful thinking, the reality is another thing altogether. Whether wealth redistribution plans of the U.N. actually work in 2015 or in 2030, U.N. plans aren’t really about building local economies, but about global empowerment. It isn’t happening for Zimbabwe and the outlook isn’t good for the U.S. either where runaway spending is concerned. Bailing out the world and supporting global governance is part of the reason why the United States national debt is where it is today.

Remember that the current nation of Zimbabwe isn’t promised tomorrow. The United States shouldn’t take the future for granted either. ~ E. Manning

June 29, 2008

Panic in Support for the Euro Reported

Germans have begun to reject euro bank notes with serial numbers from Italy, Spain, Greece and Portugal. This reality is raising concerns that public support for the monetary union may be waning in the Germany, perhaps in reaction to Ireland’s rejection of EU’s founding attempts.

Bankers, being naturally detail oriented, have detected a curious pattern where customers are withdrawing cash directly from branches as they screen bank notes to determine the origin of issue. More Germans are asking for paper from the southern states to be exchanged for German notes.

Each country prints its own notes according to its economic weight in European Union under strict guidelines from the European Central Bank in Frankfurt. For example, German notes have an “X”‘ at the start of the serial numbers.

Some people clearly suspect that southern bank notes may lose (more…)

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