Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

November 10, 2010

Obama: Embrace Globalism And The Emerging One World Economy

Barack Obama made some interesting comments about the USA economy and American attitudes during a joint commentary in Mumbai, India.

President Obama made these comments about the Federal Reserve, effectively a “no comment” statement.

The Federal Reserve is an independent body. It doesn’t take orders from the White House, and it’s important as a policy matter, as an institutional matter, that we don’t comment on particular Fed actions.

About offshoring or outsourcing, President Obama made the following remarks:

I don’t think you’ve heard me make outsourcing a bogeyman during the course of my visit. In fact, I explicitly said in my address in Mumbai to the Business Council that I think both countries are operating on some stereotypes that have outlived their usefulness.

I want to be able to say to the American people when they ask me, well, why are you spending time with India, aren’t they taking our jobs? — I want to be able to say, actually, you know what, they just created 50,000 jobs. And that’s why we shouldn’t be resorting to protectionist measures; we shouldn’t be thinking that it’s just a one-way street. I want both the citizens in the United States and citizens in India to understand the benefits of commercial ties between the two countries.

Essentially, the attitude of President Obama and Indian Prime Minister Singh is one of tough nuts to America. They advertise outsourcing as good for India and the world.

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November 7, 2010

Obama Admits Decline of US Dominance

Filed under: business, corporatism, economy, globalization, government, money, politics, recession — Tags: , , , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 6:27 pm

Today, President Barack Obama said that the USA was no longer in a position to “meet the rest of the world economically on our terms.”

Speaking at a town hall meeting in Mumbai, he said,

“I do think that one of the challenges that we are going face in the US, at a time when we are still recovering from the financial crisis is, how do we respond to some of the challenges of globalization? The fact of the matter is that for most of my lifetime and I’ll turn 50 next year – the US was such an enormously dominant economic power, we were such a large market, our industry, our technology, our manufacturing was so significant that we always met the rest of the world economically on our terms. And now because of the incredible rise of India and China and Brazil and other countries, the US remains the largest economy and the largest market, but there is real competition.”

“This will keep America on its toes. America is going to have to compete. There is going to be a tug-of-war within the US between those who see globalization as a threat and those who accept we live in a open integrated world, which has challenges and opportunities.”

President Obama disagreed with those who saw globalization as evil. He did warn that protectionist impulses in the USA will get stronger if Americans don’t see trade bringing in gains for them.

“If the American people feel that trade is just a one-way street where everybody is selling to the enormous US market but we can never sell what we make anywhere else, then the people of the US will start thinking that this is a bad deal for us and it could end up leading to a more protectionist instinct in both parties, not just among Democrats but also Republicans. So, that we have to guard against.”

President Obama noted that America could not continue to promote trade at its own expense at a time when economic power in India and China is rising. “There has to be reciprocity in our trading relationships and if we can have those kind of conversations – fruitful, constructive conversation about how we produce win-win situations, then I think we will be fine.”

October 9, 2010

World economy breaking with US

As the US economy teeters on the edge of decline and a double dip recession, emerging economies continue to grow at a fast pace, fueled by multinational corporations. This changing global economy reveals a United States that is not the center of the economic world.

Financial leaders have joined hands to decide how to boost the global economy at the annual IMF and World Bank meeting. A number of these financial leaders suggest a break up, what is known as a “de-coupling”, in the wings for a number of years, but gaining traction as the US economy stagnates. Central bankers, along with complicit US politicians, have rode the US horse into the ground and now have their eyes on the next rising star to enhance their prosperity. Most politicians advertise that the US will live forever, even though powerhouse nations through history have ebbed like the tidal flow.

The world is breaking away from the US as the consumer of last resort,” said analyst Edward Harrison, the founder of CreditWriteDowns.com. “You’ll see a lot more importance in China, in Russia.” Corporate multinationals and US politicians have raided the US economy over the last thirty years and put that stock in other economies like China, Brazil, Russia and India in the name of globalism. The view is that growth in the global economy will be much more dependent upon these countries than on the “developed economies.” Whether this is true or not remains to be seen.

Meanwhile, the US continues to run by idiot lawmakers that are afraid of multinational corporate power or are having their pockets lined behind the scenes. Like the old Roman Empire, the US seems bent on its’ own self-destruction to salve the interests of a few “leaders of men.”

September 24, 2010

U.N. Says World is at the Brink of Food Crisis through Speculation

Environmental disasters and speculative investors are to blame for volatile food commodities markets, says UN’s special adviser

The United Nations warned that the world is likely on the brink of a major new food crisis caused by environmental disasters and rampant market speculators today at an emergency meeting on food price inflation.

The U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO meeting in Rome, Italy, on September 24 was called last month after a heatwave and wildfires in Russia led to a draconian wheat export ban while food riots broke out in Mozambique, killing 13 people. U.N. experts heard that pension and hedge funds, sovereign wealth funds and large banks who speculate on commodity markets are likely to be responsible for inflation in food prices being seen across all continents.

In a new paper released this week, Olivier De Schutter, the U.N.’s special rapporteur on food, says that the increases in price and the volatility of food commodities can only be explained by the emergence of a “speculative bubble” which he traces back to early this decade.

“[Beginning in] 2001, food commodities derivatives markets, and commodities indexes began to see an influx of non-traditional investors,” De Schutter writes. “The reason for this was because other markets dried up one by one: the dotcoms vanished at the end of 2001, the stock market soon after, and the U.S. housing market in August 2007. As each bubble burst, these large institutional investors moved into other markets, each traditionally considered more stable than the last. Strong similarities can be seen between the price behavior of food commodities and other refuge values, such as gold.”

He continues: “A significant contributory cause of the price spike [has been] speculation by institutional investors who did not have any expertise or interest in agricultural commodities, and who invested in commodities index funds or in order to hedge speculative bets.”

A near doubling of many staple food prices in 2007 and 2008 led to riots in more than 30 countries and an estimated 150 million extra people going hungry. While some commodity prices have since reduced, the majority are well over 50% higher than pre-2007 figures – and are now rising quickly upwards again.

“Once again we find ourselves in a situation where basic food commodities are undergoing supply shocks. World wheat futures and spot prices climbed steadily until the beginning of August 2010, when Russia – faced with massive wildfires that destroyed its wheat harvest – imposed an export ban on that commodity. In addition, other markets such as sugar and oilseeds are witnessing significant price increases,” said De Schutter, who spoke today at The U.K. Food Group’s conference in London.

Gregory Barrow, of the U.N. World Food Program said: “What we have seen over the past few weeks is a period of volatility driven partly by the announcement from Russia of an export ban on grain food until next year, and this has driven prices up. They have fallen back again, but this has had an impact.”

Sergei Sukhov, from Russia’s agriculture ministry, told the Associated Press during a break in the meeting in Rome that the market for grains “should be stable and predictable for all participants.” He said no efforts should be spared “to the effect that the production of food be sufficient.”

“The emergency U.N. meeting in Rome is a clear warning sign that we could be on the brink of another food price crisis unless swift action is taken. Already, nearly a billion people go to bed hungry every night – another food crisis would be catastrophic for millions of poor people,” said Alex Wijeratna, ActionAid’s hunger campaigner.

An ActionAid report released last week revealed that hunger could be costing poor nations $450 billion a year – more than 10 times the amount needed to halve hunger by 2015 and meet Millennium Development Goal One.

Food prices are rising around 15% a year in India and Nepal, and similarly in Latin America and China. U.S.  maize prices this week broke through the $5-a-bushel level for the first time since September 2008, fueled by reports from U.S. farmers of disappointing yields in the early stages of their harvests. The surge in the corn price also pushed up European wheat prices to a two-year high of €238 a ton.

Elsewhere, the threat of civil unrest led Egypt this week to announce measures to increase food self-sufficiency to 70%. Partly as a result of food price rises, many middle eastern and other water-scarce countries have begun to invest heavily in farmland in Africa and elsewhere to guarantee supplies.

Although the FAO has rejected the notion of a food crisis on the scale of 2007-2008, it this week warned of greater volatility in food commodities markets in the years ahead.

At the meeting in London today, De Schutter said the only long term way to resolve the crisis would be to shift to “agro-ecological” ways of growing food. This farming, which does not depend on fossil fuels, pesticides or heavy machinery has been shown to protect soils and use less water.

“A growing number of experts are calling for a major shift in food security policies, and support the development of agroecology approaches, which have shown very promising results where implemented,” he said.

Green Party Parliament Member Caroline Lucas called for tighter regulation of the food trade. “Food has become a commodity to be traded. The only thing that matters under the current system is profit. Trading in food must not be treated as simply another form of business as usual: for many people it is a matter of life and death. We must insist on the complete removal of agriculture from the remit of the World Trade Organization,” she said.

You can read this article by Guardian environmental editor John Vidal, with reporting by various news agencies, in context here: http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2010/sep/24/food-crisis-un-emergency-meeting-rome

April 12, 2010

Multinational America & Cheap Labor

Even highly educated Americans can hardly win with a nationwide crisis of underemployed and unemployed. Clearly, America lives in the age of the wage slave, a time of mindlessness and lack of creativity. Corporate America remains addicted to outsourcing overseas, especially where cheap Indian labor is concerned. Now globalist academia, notably the University of Houston, is outsourcing teaching assistant jobs to India. Globalists are doing much more than that. Even Houston is a new center of foreign training basking in the warmth of  globalist conceit. Meanwhile, Bill Gates vis-à-vis Microsoft, has continued to sack the prospect of American jobs by sending them overseas. Since Gates can’t bring Indian help legally into America by the truckload, he is sending precious jobs overseas at a time when an unprecedented number of qualified educated Americans are out of work. Almost half of the those on the unemployed rosters have been out of work for more than six months. It seems to me that the time is nigh to outsource the national sociopaths.

It is high time to move away from the falsehood of corporate globalism to consider employing educated U.S. citizens. Having experience myself in dealing with teams of the hired from Mumbai, I must admit that they seem to be bright people on the surface. They are humble and do what they are told. Hell yes, they are eager to please! That is where the panacea ends folks! You will tell them again and again, yes… and again. You will spend hours in special conference calls dealing with “the meeting of the minds,” as they continue to pour out work that most children can do.

Multinationals: your jobs building another nation.

The communication and cultural barrier looms large as work is redone over and over. As far as being eager to please, this is hardly a surprise since corporate buildings spring from some of the worst slums of India, corporate neighbors that gleam in contrast to some of the worst ghettos the world will see. Who wants to leave a pretty polished office in favor of a human black-hole of mud and cardboard? It is time to fully realize that this is a human rights issue. Elevating foreigners that live in mud holes seems to be the human thing to do, unless you are merely elevating them to the underpaid wage-slave status as they fight in their minds about what the hell is in the minds and attitudes of managers in Corporate America. Surely “Bob Cratchit” had it no better and we have the nerve to think that globalism is doing them a favor, kind of like how imperial Britain was good for India too.

Meanwhile, the good boys and girls at Deloitte, Price Waterhouse , Microsoft, IBM and the whole lot of lousy multinational sleezoids continue to undermine and use an entire planet of human beings for what is good for corporate needs at the moment while basking in the glow of sustainability and green politics. You can add all of Wall Street and their overseas markets to the list too because this behavior is all the same thing.

Behind the corporate scenes in India, destined for a third world U.S.A.

That isn’t enough for “Multinational America.” This well-funded, organized racket is built on lies of an American labor shortage that oozes from ivy league “innovation.” They have legitimized the crime of selling out “spoiled Americans” in the hope of instilling and importing India’s caste system into the United States for their own benefit. They are debasing the nation so they can continue to ply their usury on the nation as they pimp globalism to proffer their bottom line and the meaning of their miserable existence. So much for socially responsible behavior. Too bad that President Obama doesn’t have the good sense to charge this modern-day pack of miscreants with treason. These are the sort that only Benedict Arnold could love.

Meanwhile, they can bask in the glow of globalism, an effort to justify the behavior of sociopaths. Believe me, these kids from India aren’t paying the bill. Multinational corporations are.

May 7, 2008

Central Bankers Sound Alarm Over Food Prices

Soaring food prices are helping to push up inflation all around the world, say central bankers. They urge more market competition and free trade to even out prices.

Which came first: the chicken or the egg? In this case, central bankers are not admitting that high food prices are not only caused by tighter supplies but higher inflation is caused by the central bankers themselves. Central bankers, by nature are quiet animals that never point at themselves. In this instance, global inflation has been boosted by the excessive printing of money and overextension of bank credit coupled with the inflation and devaluation of the dollar, which still operates as the tour de force of the global economy.

Global rises in food, energy and other commodity prices (more…)

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