Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

September 23, 2008

Global Liquidity Crisis: On the Brink

crisis solution

crisis solution

Turn on the TV, read the paper or peruse the latest internet news. You’ll be told that we’re on the brink of imminent crisis, a lock down of liquidity that must be remedied immediately. The Fifth Avenue Rush is on. The only solution is bipartisan unity in Congress to turn over vast power to the Bush administration and the U.S. Treasury without accountability. The Republican feel-good legislation is in place to save the home of the brave. We can do it if we can do it together. We will save the world for democracy.

The American taxpayer must trust that Henry Paulsen will use $700 billion wisely to snatch up worthless securitized bonds. Sound familiar? In the same way that the Federal Reserve Bank is totally unaccountable and is never subject to audit, the current proposal contains this proviso:

Decisions by the Secretary pursuant to the authority of this Act are non-reviewable and committed to agency discretion, and may not be reviewed by any court of law or any administrative agency.

Henry Paulson, because of the massive liquidity freeze, is about to receive kingly authority to solve the current liquidity crisis. Even after the nation spends an initial sum of $700 billion, there is no guarantee of success beyond maintaining the current business, investor climate and monetary markets, shaky though they may be. The entire proposal is designed to bailout the collapsing U.S. financial system and save the world so that the current power structure can continue unchanged, further supporting control over the failing system. In the words of the administration, the fate of every American’s retirement and savings hangs in the balance. That makes many Americans nervous, at least for those that have managed to prosper, save and invest.

bailout money grab

bailout money grab

In one more segment of authority, the executive branch of the Bush administration wants to perform another magnanimous service while exempting itself from any chance of responsibility or review for the pending results.

While the media and Congress are fussing about the lack of oversight on the project or who Henry Paulson uses to assist him in the huge money grab, the Federal Reserve Bank and the International Society of Bankers sit quietly by watching the drama like ripe fruit ready for picking. A few have pointed out that the lack of oversight is a grand opportunity for abuse or profitaking.

This current idea proposed is bold and transparent in simplicity. Have the Federal Reserve wave its monetary wand, giving buddies in the former investment banking industry piles of cash for rooting out the bad bonds and making a huge chunk of debt go away as the Federal Reserve apportions more American gold to send quietly to Swiss vaults while clueless Americans aren’t watching. No rush about the physical location of gold. International Bankers will count it anyway as their personal profit and add it to the national debt. Never mind that the Fed is already holding all the nation’s gold. Fort Knox is an illusion.

fort knox gold

fort knox gold

The funding credits will never actually need to leave the Fed. The entire process can be done electronically without a trace. The craft is in the paperwork that the U.S. Treasury will alter, permanently erasing a mountain of fraudulent debt that only the banking community and authorities can see. The scheme is perfect because the scheme is all about semantics anyway.

Never has such a bailout been proposed with such secrecy. Even the federal bailouts during the Great Depression and during the Savings and Loan collapse of the 80s never suspended judicial review. Enter an emboldened U.S. Congress led by a Democrat majority that seeks oversight and taxpayer protections. Congress claims to be keenly interested in recouping any possibility of future income derived from currently worthless securitized bonds as the Bush Administration claims. Yet, the American taxpayer will never see a penny from these worthless pieces of paper.

homeowner bailout

homeowner bailout

Democrats want to be certain that going forward, any institutions that benefit from financial insurance also bear the cost of that insurance. Congress is also interested in bailing out beleaguered homeowners that face losing their homes. On “The View,” Whoopi Goldberg and Bill Clinton agreed that enraged Americans need the same bailout consideration that Wall Street and the financial system is getting. Unlike Congress, Whoopi and Bill weren’t talking about new bankruptcy laws that Barney Frank thinks will do the trick. Americans want cold hard cash that they can retire on, like the bankers that robbed the nation.

While all of these opportunities can be justified and even supported, the possibility of pork barrel spending is likely to escalate as Senators and Representatives see the opportunity to bolster their interests. That is the part and parcel of shameless American politics in this age.

credit addiction

credit addiction

Meanwhile, a desperate executive administration and U.S. Treasury Secretary are prepared to do most anything to get legislation through Congress. Reputations are now on the line.

Paulson and President Bush have argued that the alternative is that credit markets will remain frozen. Businesses will fail because they can’t get the loans they need to operate. The economy will grind to a halt because consumers that account for two-thirds of U.S. economic activity, won’t be able to get the credit they need to keep spending. Just think, it all started with broadening the profits of bankers by using compound interest instead of simple interest. We’ve come a long way baby.

national security

national security

Unbridled credit is the insanity that this nation has been built on in the last four decades. Unbridled credit is what has enabled this nation to rise prices without raising wages. Unbridled credit is what has allowed the American consumer to sell himself into slavery to financial interests. Unbridled credit is what has built the power that politicians and business have come to depend on. Unbridled credit is why even Big Business seeks cheap Federal Reserve funding. The Federal Reserve and the International Bankers hold the key to that credit through the auspices of the federal government. The spectacle is all about power and the fear of change. This is the nation’s new national security issue. ~ E. Manning

September 3, 2008

A New Banking Crisis for Britain and Europe?

British bankers have began to hoarde their reserves and have become reluctant to engage in the usual interbank lending process that commercial banking enjoys daily. The resulting freeze in liquidity and tightening of credit that will shortly result is reminiscent of the reaction of U.S. bankers during the initial stages of the U.S. mortgage and credit crisis before the Federal Reserve Auction was created.

Apparently, the pressure from bad securitized mortgage bonds continues to rack the United Kingdom bankers. As a result fearful bankers simply shut down the process of usual banking trust, freezing the free exchange of capital that the modern world has grown accustomed to.

In April, the Bank of England offered to take on shaky mortgage-backed bonds in an effort to liquify the frozen banking system. This effort has not worked. Bankers are instead working to prop up their own internal banking instead of dealing with the larger marketplace, another reaction similar to U.S. bankers.

The liquidity freeze points to the distinct possibility of more banking failures in the UK similar to Northern Rock, in which the British government nationalized the debt. Lack of confidence is once again becoming the buzz word in British banking as fears mount. Fears in the commercial banking community are showing their reflections once again as a global financial slowdown or recession looms. ~ E. Manning

August 13, 2008

Federal Reserve Loans Not Working

The U.S. economy has seen the Federal Reserve System bail out banking for the last 9 months with very little to show for its efforts. Commercial banks have been involved in a national interbank liquidity freeze, reluctant to lend to each other since the credit squeeze started last year. While the reason isn’t readily discussed by most venues, shady and fraudulent banking instruments designed to make money is the reason for the interbank lending crisis. Banks simply don’t want to get stuck with other banks bad debt and securities. The cancer of bad securities is touching most commercial banks profoundly. Bank capital is tied up for everyone as a result, making credit access to firms and individuals difficult.

Credit auctions continue to be overbid for amounts often doubling available credit from the Fed. There are consistently more bidding institutions than available credit funds. 64 bidders sought $54.8 billion out of 25 billion available from the Fed in a recent auction. In a new stretch, the Fed and Global Central Bankers ( G8 ) are extending limited credit for 84 days instead of the traditional 25 day credit leash.

The 84 day Fed credit wasn’t enough to meet demand, so the Fed is ramping up for another standard banking auction so that commercial bankers can continue to bolster solvency levels. Banking reputations have been thoroughly smeared as even Swiss Bankers have been involved with billions in bad securities. Bank shareholders have been hit hard because bankers went with the natural flow of high-profits banking based on securities fever. The bleeding from subprime and now prime loans continue to erode the profitability of bankers, despite the fact that bankers have the power of the fractional reserve. Unfortunately, in tough times, even the fractional reserve has a way of biting back since banks have minimum financing standards for solvency. This is currently the battle that many U.S. banks are now facing.

uneasy banking alliance?

changing balance of power

In the words of the BBC there are few winners. “The financial turmoil has proved poison for policymakers dealing with it, it has provided rare meat for economists, commentators and opposition politicians.” The cash crisis in banking has driven the growth of sovereign wealth funds, giving insurance and pension entities a place to invest more of their colossal wealth in corporate assets.

Bankers have been grateful for the huge infusion of cash (credit) from foreign powers to cover their skyrocketing losses. The reality in many cases is that bankers are literally giving up the bank to outside foreign politics in order stay operational. The balance of power in the world is changing. The Federal Reserve has had little recent effect outside of pacifier value and confidence building. ~ E. Manning

May 18, 2008

Paradox of Market Turmoil

World financial market turmoil has revealed two paradoxes. The first is that after several years of high profits the global banking sector was thought to be well capitalized, even bullet-proof. Actual capital buffers and provisioning in banking were much less robust than they had seemed. Everyone forgot to measure risk and looked at the profit. Little, if nothing has changed.

The second paradox is that elements of a massive liquidity freeze occurred in certain financial market segments (for example, the United States) within a context of overall excess dollar liquidity worldwide. In other words, because of bad bank securities and the risk of accepting them or trading value-for-value, bankers on a global scale began to refuse to trade with fellow bankers to protect themselves.

World bankers are looking at these arenas for salvation: risk management in financial institut- ions; the originate-to-distribute business model of the large banks; and the coordination of financial regulation and supervision across financial institutions, markets and national borders.

World bankers say that improvement in financial literacy can be made by realigning the incentives among the originators and other participants in the securitization chain through attention to detail. (more…)

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