Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

October 12, 2008

International Bankers: Time is Short

the IMF in better times

the IMF in better times

The International Monetary Fund, an international organization that oversees the global financial system based on economic policies of its member countries, proclaimed that time is short for consensus on the international financial crisis. The finance members of industrialized nations failed to agree on absolute and unified measures to end the crisis. The IMF expects a systemic meltdown if stability in financial markets is not achieved. While the international body recommends “exceptional vigilance, coordination and readiness to take bold action,” the body is leaving the pressure and responsibility on the collective bodies of national Finance Ministers. All this from an international body that claimed in August that there would be no recession in the Eurozone.

Solvency concerns are cited as the chief concern. The reality is that solvency is determined by a set of regulations that can easy be changed, as has happened in the United States. Therefore, the definition of solvency to a reasonable extent is in the hands of Finance Ministers and national leaders. Where such a change is seen as beneficial, such a move buys time when developing a consensus is especially important.

While consensus has been difficult, developing effective means to counteract the global financial crisis has been no less elusive. Panicked Finance Ministers are looking for support from the IMF or other global authorities in a effort to deal with the crisis. Britain has developed an interbank lending guarantee that has other nations stressing to compete.

In general, G-7 and G-20 ideas are essentially the same and somewhat short on creativity. Whether injecting capital into financial institutions and insurance companies, effectively nationalizing them, or buying up worthless mortgage assets, groups of Finance Ministers are chiefly examining the importance of uniform national guarantees to protect individual economies and to avoid creating a currency run. Encouraging monetary liquidity through central banking auctions has become a mainstay in prime economies.

Most telling perhaps is a statement made by the Brazilian Finance Minister, Guido Mangega, “The problems we are facing today in the global economy must be solved by several countries, they can’t be addressed by only one country or a single continent.” Finance Minsters from the G-20, not wishing to be left out of the loop, want emerging economies to be included within the ranks of G-7 Finance Ministers or by implication, involved as part of a larger authoritarian body.

Even Arab nations, whose prosperity seemed to make them immune from catastrophe are now encountering monetary issues, property value declines and business funding problems that threaten the Arab economic fabric as in much of the world. The Arab nations are largely isolated within the Islamic banking community except from within the burgeoning oil market, which in recent years has fueled inflation rates as high as 25 per cent.

As a result of the growing crisis, the United States is seen on many fronts, notably among Muslim leaders, as having no credibility whatever. Resentment, which is already high in religious circles, is multiplying because of the perception of financial betrayal and lack of wisdom. The push for Islamic banking within Muslim circles will continue despite any devaluation of the dollar experienced.

The issue created by injecting capital into banks dilutes monetary value and ownership of individual banks. While these types of measure can create the appearance of stability, diluting monetary value creates an ongoing increase in national, as well as global inflation. With increases in credit and cash generated for financial rescues, the end result is always inflationary as the devaluation of currency sets in. The only short-term winners are holding the gold and living off the interest for their services: central bankers. Meanwhile, central banking policies are behind the continued growth in inflation because a flawed economic model that mandates liquidity through monetary production. This is currently central banking’s best hope for economic stability. ~ E. Manning

October 6, 2008

Crisis Floods Global Markets

not all love bailouts

not all love bailouts

Governments and central banks around the world grasped at measures to contain the fast-spreading financial crisis today. Investor confidence reflected on global stocks. According to the media, investors have finally decided that a recession is inevitable.

The more powerful members of the EU have reacted in panic as market volatility continues. Similar events continue to unveil with bailouts in the works. Even Fortis has new ownership. In panic, central bankers are dumping billions of euros on the market, creating another global monetary inflation hazard. A few national banks throughout the EU have moved to guarantee depositor funds causing a rash of capital movement to guaranteed banks and undermining financial security for others. More European governments followed Germany’s lead offering guarantees to savers in a frantic effort to calm fears among investors over the worst financial crisis in 80 years. The big losers portend to be the shareholders of these institutions.

economic bondage

economic bondage

The British government has promised on Monday to protect citizens in the face of global financial turmoil. Investors are terrified that the government will require partial ownership in exchange for the bailout.

For more than a week, the U.S. Federal Reserve has been working to find new ownership and capital to cover to bankrupt Wachovia Bank, even issuing and quickly retracting their statements as deals have fallen through. Right now, the Fed is trying to coax Citigroup and Wells Fargo to break up the Wachovia’s assets. Even the Fed is learning to temper its enthusiasm as deals are worked out.

While none of this is especially good news on the surface, the really bad news remains the now unseen seeds planted by central bankers as they flood the market with euros or whatever monetary unit is seen as useful. This simply weakens an already weak economy and further dilutes the value of the currency, creating more inflationary pressure.

The really bad news behind all of this news is that the United States bailout success hinges so much on foreign investment from overseas. With a global crisis in the works, only the Muslim and Saudi countries are not yet reporting huge problems beyond apparent hyperinflation caused by the huge $700 billion yearly influx of greenbacks from America. They have so many devalued dollars that spending them is a challenge. Therein lies the crux of the problem. A vicious circle of events is creating a downward global spiral that cannot be readily or quickly overcome without a reinvention or substantial revision of a new monetary system, an idea that is reportedly in discussion by the International Society of Bankers (the global central banking franchises) as an easier way out of the looming crisis if events become unmanageable. ~ E. Manning

February 10, 2008

The Seduction of Convenience

Filed under: banking, credit, government, Islam, money — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 10:25 am

Prepaid Banking Cards Sell in Muslim Banking

For years, the Muslim banking community has resisted the standard trappings of the banking industry. The National Bank of Abu Dhabi, one of the leading banks in the United Arab Emirates, has announced the issuance of its Dubai eGovernment Pre-paid card. Now, the Muslim is being offered an alternative to cash and checking as the New World Order of electronic banking and tracking further tightens the noose on the unsuspecting world: all in the name of convenience. The bankers are focusing on “the non-banked” like low-salaried employees, retirees and students.

islamicbankingandfinance.jpgThe typical publicity line is that the banking card “allows cardholders to better budget finances by limiting spending to the amount of funds that have been loaded to the card, ensuring greater convenience, benefits and security for all United Arab Emirates resident and visitors. Do you smell the control while the bankers and government officials rub their hands in glee? How easy will it be to round up tourists in the event of any uprising or government collection program? The government has absolute control of the money with this new card. Beware of the seduction of convenience.

February 6, 2008

Islamic Banking Protected from Subprime

Filed under: banking, central bank, Islam, money — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 12:00 am

Islamic banking, by its nature, is set apart from the traditional banking market. Islam invokes the principles of Sharia, the holy law set forth in the Qur’an. The Qur’an forbids the charging of interest in exchange for a loan or trading debt. Every step of a transaction is carefully reviewed by an Islamic scholar to test for compliance with the tenets of Islam.

islamicbanking.jpgBanks that operate under these principles shun collateral debt obligations linked to subprime (high risk) mortgages because the legal instruments do not comply with Muslim law. Rasheed al-Maraj, Bahrain central bank governor stated: “Islamic banks have been largely shielded from the U.S. mortgage crisis, which may even open doors for expansion beyond traditional strongholds in Arab and Asian markets. The lack of problems relating to traditional market and financing may serve to enhance the viability of the Islamic banking market and expansion into the U.S. market as prices for real estate continues to drop.

Events within the traditional banking industry and global finance provide an opportunity for growth in an alternative banking market for Islamic banking customers although there remains the risk of falling real estate values in a declining economic situation that currently exists in the U.S. Islamic banking is working on methods to reduce the risk of loss during declining market periods.

More on Islamic Banking

January 26, 2008

Islam Seduced by Banking Interests

Filed under: banking, government, money, politics — Tags: , , , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 12:00 am

islamicbanking.jpgFor years we’ve heard that Islamic law bans charging interest and dealing with the current banking system. In the eyes of Islam, interest is usury. In the U.S, Islam faithful operate without taking out loans like most citizens of the country. Bankers have had their eyes on Islam for years in an effort to get into the market with Islamic nations and Islamic nations have been eagerly seeking to justify partnerships with the banking system since 2003. Finally, after working out the kinks with Islamic religious leaders, religious leaders have come to justify working with the Society of Bankers. Bankers have (more…)

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