Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

January 9, 2011

Food Safety Bill Grants FDA Authority to Police Foreign Nations

Of all the talk about the USA Food Safety Bill, S.510, it is likely that few have actually read the language in the bill. Do the lawmakers actually know what is in it? The Food Safety Modernization Act allows the FDA to set up foreign offices.

Section 305 is entitled “BUILDING CAPACITY OF FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS WITH RESPECT TO FOOD SAFETY,” which allows the FDA the full authority to set up offices in foreign countries to dictate the food safety plans of foreign governments for any food coming into the United States. This is noted on page 217 of the Act.

SEC. 308. FOREIGN OFFICES OF THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION.
(a) IN GENERAL. – The Secretary shall establish offices of the Food and Drug Administration in foreign countries selected by the Secretary.

It then goes on to say:

(a) The Secretary shall, not later than 2 years of the date of enactment of this Act, develop a comprehensive plan to expand the technical, scientific, and regulatory food safety capacity of foreign governments, and their respective food industries, from which foods are exported to the United States.

This will allow for the global expansion of the FDA and an huge expansion of government jobs and government authority, most likely to be relegated to multinational corporations.

This Food Safety Act is to be developed under consultation to the Department of Homeland Security as well as the U.S. Treasury. As the bill states:

(b) Consultation – In developing the plan under subsection (a), the Secretary shall consult with the Secretary of Agriculture, Secretary of State, Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of Homeland Security, the United States Trade Representative, and the Secretary of Commerce, representatives of the food industry, appropriate foreign government officials, nongovernmental organizations that represent the interests of consumers, and other stakeholders.

What does the Department of Homeland Security have to do with an FDA food safety plan? Why is the U.S. Treasury involved in the food supply? The history of the Federal Reserve probably holds more of the answers here than you would care to admit.

Data sharing and international law are a big part of the Act. You can view this yourself on page 195 of the bill (at the link above).

(c) Plan – The plan developed under subsection (a) shall include, as appropriate, the following: “Provisions for secure electronic data sharing.”

This is so that the FDA can electronically track and monitor the food production activities of foreign nations. That way, if somebody in Spain tries to sell raw almonds to the USA, the FDA can make sure those almonds are irradiated or fumigated with chemicals first. Raw almonds are so dangerous they have actually been outlawed in States.

“Training of foreign governments and food producers on United States requirements for safe food” is designed to mandate the FDA’s “dead food” agenda to other nations.  This may effectively export the corporate agenda of health borne disease that the USA food industry seeks to sow. This will put more money in the pockets of the U.S. Pharmacy Corporations, expanding their power internationally, much like the U.S. has done with other industries, sending jobs overseas. There is no provision to mandate any pesticide levels where food safety is concerned.

The FDA will be allowed to “harmonize” the USA food and dietary supplement industries which could outlaw healthy doses of vitamins and minerals. RDA standards are bare minimums at best for minimal health needs.

Centralized power is likely to fuel large food corporations as they take over food production markets per government mandate, ensuring huge profits, all to the lowest bidder while the health of the nation flags. All the while, food engineers Monsanto, DuPont and other agricultural giants are likely benefactors as they push their proprietary seed and genetically modified plants on the world.

Thanks to Wikileaks, the world knows that the global GMO conspiracy is real and ripe for a corporate power grab.

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July 24, 2010

U.S. Worries Over Deflation

The nation has a nasty case of stagnation, fueled by significant employment issues and rising defaults. Prices are falling while most consumers resist buying. When deflation begins and prices fall, it seems like a good thing. Then, lower prices cut into business profits which results in trimming payrolls. This further undermines buying power, which leads to lower profits, fewer jobs and lower wages. All this results in economic contraction.

With all the cutbacks, buyers that have the funds wait for better deals through even lower prices, which magnifies deflation. As a result, the nation plunges into a downward economic spiral that is hard to escape. This is exactly what the United States faces.

The nation’s capital is feeling the guilt as they look at other in dismay about the rising deficit and inflation, even though they advertise to the world that inflation doesn’t exist here. Economists around the world see great potential for deflation of the dollar, which already would be the case, were it not for declining currencies across the globe.

The statistics say it all. Consumer prices have declined each month for the last three months, putting inflation above last year. They claim that the core inflation rate is at a 44 year low at less than one percent. So why are they worried? The Federal Reserve likes to see an inflation rate of 3% because this puts more money in their corporate pockets.

Private economists and financial experts are more concerned. Some of them see the possibility of deflation at more than fifty percent. This is compounded by unemployment, lack of production and lower spending.

Should deflation occur, the central bank has the tools to reverse it according to Ben Bernanke, even though the Federal Reserve has interest rates at historical lows and has pumped trillions into the financial system. The books have been cooked baby, to the loss of the United States. Bernanke claims the U.S. economy is more vibrant and productive than Japan’s was in the 90s. The difference is supposed to be that Japan’s labor face was actually declining, while the States has plenty of labor.

In my words, there are plenty of financially-broken and impoverished Americans to take advantage of, with the hope of restoring the economy on their collective backs. Wall Street and multinationals aren’t suffering beyond the losses of jobs they incurred during the recession. Let’s face facts, they didn’t suffer much at all. Their employees did. That’s the way it is.

The little guy at the bottom, so far, is the one that has truly paid for the recession and the remainder of its fallout. They are ones that will continue to pay.

September 16, 2009

Double Dip Recession or Recovery?

Filed under: corporatism, credit, economy — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 7:55 am

Global industrial production now shows clear signs of recovering at least when comparing the current ‘recession’ with the Great Depression. During that time, a decline in industrial production continued for a full three years. The question remains regarding final demand for this increased production. Will renewed demand actually materialize or did the U.S. government create a small bubble with $2 billion “Cash for Clunkers” program? Will consumer spending, especially in the US, remain weak, causing the increase in production to go into inventories? If production simply falls into inventories, this will result in sharp cut backs and result in a return to recession. The labor market combined with ailing business credit and finance in the U.S. does not hold out much promise for an end to the recession. Will the Obama administration jigger with credit markets to somehow expand credit markets?

Global stock markets and investment banking and profiteering have mounted a sharp recovery since the beginning of the year. Still, the decline in stock market wealth remains even greater than at a comparable stage of the Great Depression. The downward spiral in global trade volumes has abated. This may be due to the return of the old ways of doing business that President Obama has decried publicly in the last few days. Data exists for June that shows a modest uptick in trade, but  the collapse of global trade remains dramatic by the standards of the Great Depression.

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