Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

June 27, 2010

Jobs & G20: Budget Slashing Fever & Fantasy

To hear the G-20 proclaim it, the U.S. and other “prime economies” had better slash their budget deficits before the world comes to an end. The U.S. Senate quashes continued aid for the unemployed. Wall Street investment firms and banking succeeds in watering down financial reform. The fantasy continues while economists and politicians worry behind the scenes.  Even VP Joe Biden openly admitted that the United States will not regain the jobs that were lost in the “Great Recession.”

The official jobless rate, projected at below 10%, is pure fiction and must treated as such by those that seek the truth. It doesn’t consider many unemployed people that have dropped off the charts into oblivion. Underemployment is a national plague that the Labor Bureau of Statistics has revealed. Many are the discouraged job seekers and those that have settled for part-time work. The U.S. Labor Department shows that there are 79 million men in America between the ages of 25 and 65. Nearly 18 million of them, a record 22%, are out of work. This doesn’t include the underemployed. The impact is larger in African-American men.

The financial markets, like the government lawmakers, could care less about the deficit. Perhaps they should. As a result, investment rates in bonds is down. Almost all of them ignore engineered inflation which pays off central bankers to the tune of about 10% yearly, the real loss in buying power for the nation. In the meantime, the official inflation rate is a “convenient” 3% most years. Powers that be project an inflation rate 2.3% yearly for the next 30 years. Dreamland. Because of what is really a stagflation economy, falling prices and deflation of the dollar are more likely.

Wall Street and multinational capitalism seems to be in robust condition, to the cost of everyone but them. Corporate profit margins have reached record levels at 36% as the average American is short circuited entirely. These profits have never been so high since record keeping began. These figures are much the same as they were in the Reagan administration.

More than half of the national budget funds defense (don’t forget the wars), national debt interest and Social Security/Medicare. Politicians are eyeballing cuts on the latter, often silent as a senior political voice fades away. Don’t kid yourself. You’ll pay for seniors and the disabled one way or the other. Don’t kid yourself about the other major expenses either. Meanwhile, the national budget has climbed steadily for decades in the 6% to 10% range, much higher than the professed inflation rate.

There are no easy answers beyond beginning to live within our means as a nation. For years, Americans had forgotten about this necessity, encouraged by the system to spend endlessly, until the recession hit us between the eyes. Only bankers, multinationals and Wall Street have profited in their own economic bubble. Government has forgotten what economic balance and locally productive jobs mean, threatening to destroy their own system of weights and balances with unfettered spending and wars overseas, designed to keep terrorist attacks overseas and out of America. We have created our own reality. Are we willing to change?

Advertisements

April 16, 2010

Video: Holding Wall Street Accountable

President Obama is selling the strongest consumer protections ever, bringing transparency to financial dealings. He suggests closing loopholes to stop recklessness and irresponsibility and to hold Wall Street accountable while giving shareholders new power in the financial system. President Obama lays out what Wall Street Reform is about, and questions whether opposition from the Senate Republican Leader might have something to do with his recent meeting with Wall Street executives.

May 12, 2009

Wall Street Giddy with High Times to Come

economic crisisWe live in exciting times. The stock market is up 100 points… or who knows what goodness corporate investors are blessed with today. Wall Street mavens and financial wizards are feeling giddy with delight. They want good times so badly that they are already deluding themselves that the recession is over and that runaway prosperity is in the wings. It’s time to start making money all over again the way “we” used to. After all, nothing has changed beyond massive cast infusions to hold up the system. Multitudes of banks, corporate mongers, financial wizards and wishful investors are convinced that we are about to relive heady good times without an ounce of reform or correction in the system that jack built. They may be right.

bear stearns collapseThe longer reform takes, the less likely reform is to happen, at least if financial and corporate simple simons have their way. It’s time to stop pretending that the Wall Street economy is the same as the real economy that everyone lives in. Wall Street hasn’t met with total and final meltdown because the Wall Street economy has been rescued. They have lived to see another day because of government bailout, presumably at taxpayer expense. Yep, Wall Street seems to be showing signs of life along with the giddiness that goes along with having a future without any reform or consequences. A real party is set to ensue at the expense of all. The real economy that the rest of America lives is another matter altogether.

What is truly important where the economy is concerned is whether real Americans can find work. If Americans can’t find work or create work that they use to survive, the country is in trouble, pure and simple. 539,000 Americans lost their jobs last month after many months of ongoing successive unemployment disaster. Since the recession officially began in December 2007, 5.7 million jobs have been given the write off by government employment statistics. The reality is actually even worse.

Still, there has been plenty of impressive talk about the new world of reform that America will enjoy, but little has been done beyond the talk. Regulatory reform is dying on the government vine of important projects.

Geithner has quipped, “We are being dramatically more aggressive than I believe any serious government has ever been, certainly in generations, in responding to financial crises. So if you look at the scale of action, look at the quality of initiative we’ve taken, I think it dramatically exceeds even the best-managed crises we’ve seen before.” Ple-e-ze. The system continues just as before, but without any reform or any real ideas for reform that hold any substance. The Masters of the Economy can’t seem to wrap their minds around the banking deluge that has brought us to our knees, much less figure out a way to reform it. They just don’t want to rock the boat of monetary largess. Geithner told Congress that fixing the system would be accomplished not by “modest repairs”, but by “new rules of the game.” I agree that what is playing out between government, corporate bankers and central bankers is a game. That much is obvious.

People are watching. Are you? ~ E. Manning

February 23, 2009

PM Brown: New Global Economy

pm-brown-berlusconi-romeBritish Prime Minister Gordon Brown has stressed the importance of April’s G20 ‘Economic Recovery Summit’ in London in the bid to strike a “global deal” that will “speed up the recovery of the world economy”. He and other European Union members are advocating a new global financial system, but have backed off somewhat due to the reluctance of U.S. support. His recent statement in Rome revealed that all nations need to inject resources into their own economies as well as agree on ways to reform international institutions.

Currently, he is recommending new policies that he calls ‘fairness principles’ against “old excesses” in the banking community, a standard of stewardship instead of speculation. In the meantime, Brown and other European Union members are advocating unity in opposing moves towards protectionist trade policies. They see the U.S. as a major opponent where such policies are concerned.

Back in the United States, international bank holding company, Citigroup continues its precipitous decline. The U.S. government is looking at boosting its’ controlling interest in the banking firm to boost confidence and maintain solvency from toxic debt, part of the speculation that PM Gordon Brown was referring to.  Britain is dealing with similar issues relating to the Royal Bank of Scotland. ~ E. Manning

January 8, 2009

How Will Obama Create a Wall Street Miracle?

obama-discusses-stimulus-2009Throughout America’s history, there have been some years that simply rolled into the next without much notice or fanfare. Then there are the years that come along once in a generation – the kind that mark a clean break from a troubled past, and set a new course for our nation. So started Barack Obama’s “stimulus speech” today. Perhaps Obama’s opening statement is somewhat understated, but certainly well placed in the realm of psychology.

The emphasis of his speech was largely inspirational in nature, but held a few small pearls where ideas are concerned. One area is of special concern:

“…it means reforming a weak and outdated regulatory system so that we can better withstand financial shocks and better protect consumers, investors, and businesses from the reckless greed and risk-taking that must never endanger our prosperity again. No longer can we allow Wall Street wrongdoers to slip through regulatory cracks. No longer can we allow special interests to put their thumbs on the economic scales. No longer can we allow the unscrupulous lending and borrowing that leads only to destructive cycles of bubble and bust.”

obama-big-brotherSafety in America is rarely a hard sell for a people obsessed with their own security. How is President Obama going to accomplish this miracle of financial national health that not a single man in existence has dared to attempt to act on? How will America create the miracle of coveted and elusive financial transparency without creating a “big brother” situation in the realm of business, privacy and the American Dream? How can a system be created that doesn’t limit freedom while making runaway theft and abuse a topic of the past on Wall Street and in financial circles. Much like Bush’s “war on terror” seemed like a good idea when the twin towers fell, a dramatic change in course including an invasion of privacy where Corporate America and Wall Street are concerned could be a slippery slope.

Unfortunately, the U.S. Federal Government is not a bastion of transparency in any regard, which leaves many Americans pausing to consider: “What will I have to give up to keep America safe from reckless greed and risk-taking that must never endanger prosperity again.” Is America preparing itself for another “war on terror” in the name of financial literacy? What new technology and control system will we use to create this mandated financial transparency or is this a resolution that will fall neatly into the hands of global finance ministers?

Nancy Pelosi and the elected lawmakers are about to make more bailout history in the hope of abating the tide of recession with the intention of avoiding economic depression. There will be no Congressional vacation without a legislative solution for bettering the economy. So far, throwing money and liquidity a la Milton Friedman has done little to help the situation. In desperation, the Feds are looking to avoid the specter of an 25% American unemployment rate and the resulting unpopularity, misery and perhaps rebellion against established authority as millions bite the economic dust in a nation ill equipped to deal with any blight. What America has now is nothing less than political panic.

February 11, 2008

Fed Backs Up the FDIC while Bush Fiddles

bush-fiddles-internet.jpgThe role of abusive lending practices has become of special concern to the Fed in their publicity measures. Since the quiet admission by the FDIC on October 24 regarding abusive loan practices in the mortgage and banking industry, the Federal Reserve has recently continued to sound the alarm for the need for bankers to voluntarily change policies within the banking structure to avoid and eliminate continued banking losses, particularly based in the mortgage sector. Bankers have failed to protect borrowers with proper underwriting and protection as well as predatory loan rates. The Federal Reserve has advised tight-fisted bankers (more…)

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.