Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

October 9, 2010

World economy breaking with US

As the US economy teeters on the edge of decline and a double dip recession, emerging economies continue to grow at a fast pace, fueled by multinational corporations. This changing global economy reveals a United States that is not the center of the economic world.

Financial leaders have joined hands to decide how to boost the global economy at the annual IMF and World Bank meeting. A number of these financial leaders suggest a break up, what is known as a “de-coupling”, in the wings for a number of years, but gaining traction as the US economy stagnates. Central bankers, along with complicit US politicians, have rode the US horse into the ground and now have their eyes on the next rising star to enhance their prosperity. Most politicians advertise that the US will live forever, even though powerhouse nations through history have ebbed like the tidal flow.

The world is breaking away from the US as the consumer of last resort,” said analyst Edward Harrison, the founder of CreditWriteDowns.com. “You’ll see a lot more importance in China, in Russia.” Corporate multinationals and US politicians have raided the US economy over the last thirty years and put that stock in other economies like China, Brazil, Russia and India in the name of globalism. The view is that growth in the global economy will be much more dependent upon these countries than on the “developed economies.” Whether this is true or not remains to be seen.

Meanwhile, the US continues to run by idiot lawmakers that are afraid of multinational corporate power or are having their pockets lined behind the scenes. Like the old Roman Empire, the US seems bent on its’ own self-destruction to salve the interests of a few “leaders of men.”

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September 24, 2010

U.N. Says World is at the Brink of Food Crisis through Speculation

Environmental disasters and speculative investors are to blame for volatile food commodities markets, says UN’s special adviser

The United Nations warned that the world is likely on the brink of a major new food crisis caused by environmental disasters and rampant market speculators today at an emergency meeting on food price inflation.

The U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO meeting in Rome, Italy, on September 24 was called last month after a heatwave and wildfires in Russia led to a draconian wheat export ban while food riots broke out in Mozambique, killing 13 people. U.N. experts heard that pension and hedge funds, sovereign wealth funds and large banks who speculate on commodity markets are likely to be responsible for inflation in food prices being seen across all continents.

In a new paper released this week, Olivier De Schutter, the U.N.’s special rapporteur on food, says that the increases in price and the volatility of food commodities can only be explained by the emergence of a “speculative bubble” which he traces back to early this decade.

“[Beginning in] 2001, food commodities derivatives markets, and commodities indexes began to see an influx of non-traditional investors,” De Schutter writes. “The reason for this was because other markets dried up one by one: the dotcoms vanished at the end of 2001, the stock market soon after, and the U.S. housing market in August 2007. As each bubble burst, these large institutional investors moved into other markets, each traditionally considered more stable than the last. Strong similarities can be seen between the price behavior of food commodities and other refuge values, such as gold.”

He continues: “A significant contributory cause of the price spike [has been] speculation by institutional investors who did not have any expertise or interest in agricultural commodities, and who invested in commodities index funds or in order to hedge speculative bets.”

A near doubling of many staple food prices in 2007 and 2008 led to riots in more than 30 countries and an estimated 150 million extra people going hungry. While some commodity prices have since reduced, the majority are well over 50% higher than pre-2007 figures – and are now rising quickly upwards again.

“Once again we find ourselves in a situation where basic food commodities are undergoing supply shocks. World wheat futures and spot prices climbed steadily until the beginning of August 2010, when Russia – faced with massive wildfires that destroyed its wheat harvest – imposed an export ban on that commodity. In addition, other markets such as sugar and oilseeds are witnessing significant price increases,” said De Schutter, who spoke today at The U.K. Food Group’s conference in London.

Gregory Barrow, of the U.N. World Food Program said: “What we have seen over the past few weeks is a period of volatility driven partly by the announcement from Russia of an export ban on grain food until next year, and this has driven prices up. They have fallen back again, but this has had an impact.”

Sergei Sukhov, from Russia’s agriculture ministry, told the Associated Press during a break in the meeting in Rome that the market for grains “should be stable and predictable for all participants.” He said no efforts should be spared “to the effect that the production of food be sufficient.”

“The emergency U.N. meeting in Rome is a clear warning sign that we could be on the brink of another food price crisis unless swift action is taken. Already, nearly a billion people go to bed hungry every night – another food crisis would be catastrophic for millions of poor people,” said Alex Wijeratna, ActionAid’s hunger campaigner.

An ActionAid report released last week revealed that hunger could be costing poor nations $450 billion a year – more than 10 times the amount needed to halve hunger by 2015 and meet Millennium Development Goal One.

Food prices are rising around 15% a year in India and Nepal, and similarly in Latin America and China. U.S.  maize prices this week broke through the $5-a-bushel level for the first time since September 2008, fueled by reports from U.S. farmers of disappointing yields in the early stages of their harvests. The surge in the corn price also pushed up European wheat prices to a two-year high of €238 a ton.

Elsewhere, the threat of civil unrest led Egypt this week to announce measures to increase food self-sufficiency to 70%. Partly as a result of food price rises, many middle eastern and other water-scarce countries have begun to invest heavily in farmland in Africa and elsewhere to guarantee supplies.

Although the FAO has rejected the notion of a food crisis on the scale of 2007-2008, it this week warned of greater volatility in food commodities markets in the years ahead.

At the meeting in London today, De Schutter said the only long term way to resolve the crisis would be to shift to “agro-ecological” ways of growing food. This farming, which does not depend on fossil fuels, pesticides or heavy machinery has been shown to protect soils and use less water.

“A growing number of experts are calling for a major shift in food security policies, and support the development of agroecology approaches, which have shown very promising results where implemented,” he said.

Green Party Parliament Member Caroline Lucas called for tighter regulation of the food trade. “Food has become a commodity to be traded. The only thing that matters under the current system is profit. Trading in food must not be treated as simply another form of business as usual: for many people it is a matter of life and death. We must insist on the complete removal of agriculture from the remit of the World Trade Organization,” she said.

You can read this article by Guardian environmental editor John Vidal, with reporting by various news agencies, in context here: http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2010/sep/24/food-crisis-un-emergency-meeting-rome

July 16, 2009

Global Economic Crisis: G8 and the Papacy

G8 ItalyDuring the G8 economic meetings and debate in Italy, Pope Benedict released a new encyclical saying “there is urgent need of a true world political authority.” In that document, Pope Benedict XVI urged G8 leaders meeting in Italy to rewrite global financial rules and to defend the world’s poor from the effects of the economic crisis.

responsibility of the market

In and of itself, the market is not, and must not become, the place where the strong subdue the weak. Society does not have to protect itself from the market, as if the development of the latter were ipso facto to entail the death of authentically human relations. Admittedly, the market can be a negative force, not because it is so by nature, but because a certain ideology can make it so. It must be remembered that the market does not exist in the pure state. It is shaped by the cultural configurations which define it and give it direction. Economy and finance, as instruments, can be used badly when those at the helm are motivated by purely selfish ends. Instruments that are good in themselves can thereby be transformed into harmful ones. But it is man’s darkened reason that produces these consequences, not the instrument per se. Therefore it is not the instrument that must be called to account, but individuals, their moral conscience and their personal and social responsibility.

responsibility of business

Owing to their growth in scale and the need for more and more capital, it is becoming increasingly rare for business enterprises to be in the hands of a stable director who feels responsible in the long term, not just the short term, for the life and the results of his company, and it is becoming increasingly rare for businesses to depend on a single territory. Moreover, the so-called outsourcing of production can weaken the company’s sense of responsibility towards the stakeholders — namely the workers, the suppliers, the consumers, the natural environment and broader society — in favour of the shareholders, who are not tied to a specific geographical area and who therefore enjoy extraordinary mobility. ...business management cannot concern itself only with the interests of the proprietors, but must also assume responsibility for all the other stakeholders who contribute to the life of the business: the workers, the clients, the suppliers of various elements of production, the community of reference.

The papacy has taken an interesting step by inserting itself into the G8 debate framework and  by ordering the involvement of Italy in the process. Certainly, in much earlier times, the papacy was directly involved in such matters without better consequences in those times. History is the best  witness of that truth. Now, the pope indicates that we need a man in charge once again as if the G8 institution is really in charge beyond politics. The real charge has been given to multinational corporations including central bankers on a global basis. The central bankers operate as a global corporate fraternal brotherhood through none other than the Swiss and Rome. Is the papacy and politics going to ‘take authority back’ or have they really lost any authority? The reality is that the papacy already holds ‘such coveted authority’ through the central bankers. Most of them have simply forgotten their moral compass in their need to service their clients. Pope Benedict is simply reminding his league that he holds them to a higher priority and that they need to exert a new influence as they continue to profit from money lending.

G8 first ladies and pope

February 23, 2009

PM Brown: New Global Economy

pm-brown-berlusconi-romeBritish Prime Minister Gordon Brown has stressed the importance of April’s G20 ‘Economic Recovery Summit’ in London in the bid to strike a “global deal” that will “speed up the recovery of the world economy”. He and other European Union members are advocating a new global financial system, but have backed off somewhat due to the reluctance of U.S. support. His recent statement in Rome revealed that all nations need to inject resources into their own economies as well as agree on ways to reform international institutions.

Currently, he is recommending new policies that he calls ‘fairness principles’ against “old excesses” in the banking community, a standard of stewardship instead of speculation. In the meantime, Brown and other European Union members are advocating unity in opposing moves towards protectionist trade policies. They see the U.S. as a major opponent where such policies are concerned.

Back in the United States, international bank holding company, Citigroup continues its precipitous decline. The U.S. government is looking at boosting its’ controlling interest in the banking firm to boost confidence and maintain solvency from toxic debt, part of the speculation that PM Gordon Brown was referring to.  Britain is dealing with similar issues relating to the Royal Bank of Scotland. ~ E. Manning

February 15, 2009

Rome: Central Banking, Finance See Crisis in Power

banking-goldNew U.S. Treasury Secretary, policy maker for the International Monetary Fund and former Federal Reserve presidential drone Timothy Geithner claims that the world faces the worst economic and financial crisis in decades . In his mind, government, facing growing domestic unease over the millions of jobs being lost, must respond forcefully. Geither has reassured the concerned central bankers and panicked finance ministers at the crisis meeting in Rome that President Barack Obama has ensured that implementing the new stimulus package would be done in a way that respects America’s international obligations.

“We are confronted with a broader and deeper slowdown than has been experienced in decades,” said U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner at the G7 Economic Crisis Summit this weekend in Rome. “We will work closely with our colleagues in the G7 and the G20 to build consensus on reforms that match the scope of the problem revealed by this crisis.” Mr. Geithner working to win the hearts of skeptical fellow bankers and finance ministers as they seek to stabilize their own interests and continue to propel globalism and the power of central bankers to new heights. They want a new “Bretton Woods” monetary agreement that promises to change the world and build a New World Order.

At the same time, Geithner has admitted his lack of original thinking. He revealed to G7 ministers that he wants to “get it right” before launching the U.S. stimulus and bailout program so that he would not need to shift strategy midstream, while requesting their thoughts on U.S. strategy. Geithner is apparently still thinking inside the box of Wall Street training to the chagrin of his globalist friends. In fact, few of them are thinking outside of any box beyond their own self-interest.

obama-and-monetary-genius

Fearing a resurgence of protectionism and an obstacle to globalism, crisis talks ended in Rome Saturday with a unified pledge to do all that can be done to combat recession without distorting the myth of global free trade.

The media has proclaimed that Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner came to the Rome this weekend to prove to Group of Seven colleagues that he was up to the job of fixing the U.S. financial system. The only item that he proved was that he is one of them, a brotherhood of bankers in lockstep meeting where control of the banking economy firmly rests: the halls of Rome and the Vatican.

Deutsche Bank Securities chief economist stated: “It’s not big enough. There are few details. The administration is trying to buy time and they don’t get the fact that we need to get something yesterday.” The underground criticism is that the Federal Reserve and the U.S. Government are not playing into the hands of globalists and Roman-based central bankers fast enough. In the meantime, Geithner is speaking out of two sides of his mouth. ~ E. Manning

November 7, 2008

Obama Promises Change: Fed Wants Control

conflict-of-power Obama FedWith the election of the new 44th U.S. President of the United States, the mandate of U.S. politics has been clarified. The hope of much of the American populace has been ignited. The Federal Reserve and the global consortium of central bankers aren’t nearly so excited, showing a typical understated and conservative resistance to change that doesn’t put them in the driver’s seat.

Apparently Kevin Warsh, Governor of the Federal Reserve believes that the world should look upon the financial hell of the last year with a hint of reminisce. “This challenge of creating a new financial architecture is hardly unique to the United States. The difficult choices made by policymakers and market participants around the globe will have real implications for future growth prospects.” That is in fact what many world leaders are intently interested in at the projected global financial summit that is planned at U.N. headquarters in New York City. The wild promotion of the financial summit is driven by the desire to change the current financial architecture.

Warsh spews plenty of bankerspeak which essentially boils down to this summary: the new financial architecture must be properly understood, in full recognition of current business relationships and restrained accordingly. Not so coincidentally, this recommendation would keep the control firmly among the International Society of Bankers, the loosely amalgamated brotherhood of central bankers headquartered in Switzerland and Rome.

Warsh correctly blames the current financial crisis on inadequate market discipline, excessive reliance on credit ratings coupled with poor credit and liquidity risk-management practices by many financial firms. However, until recently, the Federal Reserve has been unwilling to promote any changes, instead promoting the vaguely governmental mantra of financial literacy.

Warsh recognizes the global economic challenge, but does not admire the “implementation of well-intended housing policies.” Instead, the central banking consortium clearly sees the new financial architecture solely in business terms that will fuel economic growth, a clear promotion of continued Republican financial policy that has been gradually adopted over the last several decades. In essense, the advance of Republican power, policies and laissez-faire trickle-down economics has bolstered the role of not only the Federal Reserve, but the global power of central bankers through the power and prestige of the dollar, now firmly under their control.

The new Obama administration has more to fight than mere Republican policies. They must come squarely to terms with global bankers that currently hold the keys to their financial success. With the current fiscal situation of this nation regarding the fiat money of the dollar, the bankers have politicians largely where they want them. Arguably, John F. Kennedy lost his life as a result of opposing the global central banking community. They still hold the same power of life and death in the world today, only more so. ~ E. Manning

September 11, 2008

The Con Game of Securitization and Wealth

crisis through securitization

crisis through securitization

According to Federal Reserve’s Vice Chairman Donald Kohn, “One reason for the loosening of standards was the expectation that house prices would continue to rise and even more certainly that they could not fall in all regions at the same time, supporting diversification through securitization.”

This small sentence combined with a summary of all the accumulated evidence maintained by the Federal Reserve shows the propensity for a lack of regard for economic concerns over the immediate concerns of profit.

“Rising prices would enable lenders to recoup their funds even if the borrower was unable to service the loan, mostly because the borrower would be able to obtain extra cash through refinancing. Expectations of house price appreciation facilitated and interacted with the increasing complexity of mortgage securities, including multiple securitizations of the same loan, which made it virtually impossible for ultimate lenders to monitor the creditworthiness of borrowers. This was a task they had outsourced to credit rating agencies. The absence of investor caution and due diligence was especially noticeable for the highest-rated tranches of securitized debt.”

securitized vomit

securitized vomit

Who started the securitization of loans to begin with? Give the government geniuses at Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac credit for the wunderkind of shaky banking ‘o so many years ago. That is why authorities in banking and in government are quite mum about the evil and deception of securitized bonds. What is worse, they have no intent to change a thing.

The Federal Reserve is still brainstorming new ways to “ameliorate systemic risk. That said, a host of difficult judgments are inherent in how we establish such a system.” That is the trillion dollar question. In the words of Donald Kohn; “How we can structure these requirements and other aspects of regulation to damp, rather than reinforce, the natural procyclical tendencies of the financial system?”

economic usury

economic usury

If the U.S. economy were equated to an automobile engine, we would be running on half the cylinders. The Federal Reserve and other surrogate economists don’t have a clue and are now discussing “solutions” among themselves. Global bankers long for a solution to the trillion dollar question and they want to continue doing the same old things as long as it makes them money for the short-term. The idea is not what is good for any economy, but what is good for quick profits for themselves. That is what banking around the world has come to represent: corporate profit behind the scenes and personal profit while that is possible. Never forget that the Federal Reserve and global central bankers are corporations bent on making a profit, part of a “franchise” of banks that loosely report to Swiss and Roman bankers. They live off of the world; therefore economies are simply tools for wealth. That is the danger nations, governments and peoples face.

Don’t fool yourself. Global bankers are running the world to your peril. However, the sophisticated United States government and others are all for making a profit while they can, oblivious to the danger or convinced that they will live forever while central banking pumps them dry. ~ E. Manning

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