Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

September 27, 2008

U.S. Sovereignty Lost to Federal Reserve

a corporate nation

United States now a multinational corporate nation

For a long time the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has been committed to deregulation and a proponent of voluntary regulation. The head of the SEC, Christopher Cox admits that voluntary regulation has been a major contributor to the market and economic collapse. By his admission, the government regulatory oversight program was fundamentally flawed from the beginning.

The reality is that the SEC is out of a job because investment banks in the strict sense no longer exist. The SEC will still have primary responsibility for regulating securities brokers and dealers. However, the interesting prospect is that all future oversight will be turned over to the quasi-governmental Federal Reserve under Ben Bernanke. All the government players have agreed that government regulatory failures brought on the economic collapse.

A grand attempt to extort the nation has been made by Henry Paulson as he claims that the United States must rush into a solution that has been evolving for the last twenty years. His reputation is on the line. The reputation of the Bush administration is on the line if they still have one. The reality behind the immediate panic of the crisis rests firmly on the loss of jobs in America as bad mortgage securities continue to implode on nation. Trust across the board has been diminished and lost. The crisis of confidence reigns supreme.

The Federal Reserve continues to attempt to suck up more and more control and power. And why not? They hold the purse strings and ultimately the support required to run the nation. The United States has lost its sovereignty to what is effectively a multinational corporation courtesy of the mindless politicians that citizens elected to man the helm of the United States. They have lost the will to manage money, turning the nation into a den of slavery. The United States is effectively a corporation that belongs to International Bankers, a fascist state of sorts.

corporate slaves

corporate slaves

The Federal Reserve cannot be audited even though there have been some moves by Congress to make the attempt. The Fed has resisted responsibility for national accountability, instead using economic theory and global banking governance to bolster its position and control over the dollar. The world is now effectively run by an International Banking Cartel that on this website is referred to as the International Society of Bankers. ~ E. Manning

For more information on this topic including the hierarchy of the global banking system, review this website.

 

August 10, 2008

Banks Eat Billions; Credit Crunch Expands

paranoid banking firms gamble on their importance

paranoid banking firms gamble on their importance

The Securities and Exchange Commission stepped in and decided that auction-rate securities have been improperly sold to the public. They haven’t said much else as they carefully watch over the fold of now paranoid bankers. Investment bankers have plenty of egg on their face with punitive action in the immediate future by the Feds.

Citigroup and Merrill Lynch have decided to buy back billions of dollars of securities without admitting liability officially because of state regulator pressure. Bank of America and Countrywide are firmly ensconced in trouble. Swiss giant UBS is in the throes of negotiating a payout that could be in the 25 billion dollar region. As private citizens and investors, we know the reality of the situation. Bankers have tried to play us for fools for the almighty dollar and perhaps investors bit off too much, too soon in the haste for profit.

In theory, when times get better larger investors and even banks should be able to sell off the securities once the markets ease and there’s more credit in the system. That is the public line, but the truth is probably altogether different. Selling off investments with major liquidity issues is a big maybe considering the quantity of these beleaguered banking instruments. Following the aftermath of the subprime mortgage debacle, this is yet another blow to the reputation of investment banks, who may struggle to sell such “sweet deals” in future times even at fire sale prices.

British banks are taking huge hits as a result of the credit crunch with increased pressure to perform for stockholders. Lloyds, Halifax and Alliance & Leicester have been fairly decimated profit-wise. Now RBS and Barclays are taking turns with profit thrashing. British banks haven’t found the credit crunch much easier than U.S. banks. Housing prices continue to drop in the U.S. and the United Kingdom. Foreclosures are a uniform blight in both economies while bankers and economies struggle to adjust. The U.S. market has lost nearly a million homes to foreclosure with more on the way: the worst since the Great Depression.

August 8, 2008

Bankers Seek to Buy Out Uncle Sam on Fraud

Regulators have been investigating Wall Street firms for their role in the sales and marketing of auction-rate investments.

Wall Street agreed to buy back more than $17 billion in securities that they fraudulently sold to retail customers paving the way for other banks and brokerage firms to do the same.

Merrill Lynch jumped ahead of regulator investigatory scrutiny, announcing that they will buy back about $10 billion in auction-rate investments that it sold to retail investors.

Citigroup reached a settled with state and federal regulators, agreeing to buy back about $7.3 billion of auction-rate securities that it sold to retail customers. As recompense for misconduct, Citigroup will pay a $100 million fine for its misconduct. The securities are essentially worthless, even though the buyers were told that the securities were safe and easy to cash in.

Even Bank of America is under attack with subpoenas related to securities sales. Taking on responsibility of bank instruments in bank bailouts has likely posed an additional headache.

At this time, institutional investors are still out in the cold, but both firms claim to be working on a resolution on problems with institutional investors in the hopes of avoiding more heat and gaining brownie points from the federal government. A rush of settlements are expected in the next few months as Wall Street aims to absolve itself.

Regulators are starting to pile on in a sort of informational and investigational bankers bloodletting. The Securities and Exchange Commission has elected to stay out the recent penalties as they expect to weigh in on their own investigation. From all appearance, Wall Street’s troubles have only just begun. Bankers know their guilt. Can they distract the investigations to avoid the embarassment as the propensity of their fraud is exposed to the nation? Seeking to buy out authorities may be seen as an easy way out as the financial onslaught on Wall Street and for banking in general continues.

July 8, 2008

The Fed: Power and Protection Rules

The Federal Reserve, with new power in hand, intends to issue new rules next week aimed at protecting future home buyers from scandalous lending practices. The media has proclaimed the new rules are the most sweeping response to a housing crisis that has propelled foreclosures to record highs. Considering what is happening to American home buyers, this might considered to be true. The most sweeping response has been the bailout of Wall Street beginning with Bear Stearns in this writer’s humble opinion.

The fact is that there are plenty of regulations. Regulations did not stop bankers from breaking the law with predatory loans, nor stopped investors from (more…)

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