Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

April 3, 2011

The World’s Greatest Ponzi Scheme

Filed under: central bank, credit, economy, government, inflation, money, recession — Tags: , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 9:11 pm

house of cardsIn the month of March, the U.S. government spent more than eight times its monthly tax receipts, including money spent for maturing U.S. treasuries.

The U.S. treasury cleared $128.18 billion in tax receipts during the month of March, but paid out a total of $1.05 trillion, which included $49.8 billion in Social Security benefits, $47.4 billion in Medicare benefits, $22.58 billion in Medicaid benefits and $37.9 billion in defense spending. The real financial beating springs from maturing U.S. treasuries where the U.S. paid out $705.3 billion.

In order for the U.S. government to stay afloat with only $128.18 billion in tax receipts, it had to spend $72.5 billion from the balance of cash on hand. This closed the month at $118.1 billion, including the sales of $18 billion worth of TARP assets. Most importantly, the U.S. treasury had to sell $786.5 billion in new treasury bonds, which it will be required to mature at a still higher in the future in order to keep the shirt of its’ back. Surely this is the greatest Ponzi scheme ever executed on the world as the government endlessly seeks to outrun the debt that it creates. The nation is able to fund government expenditures and pay off maturing debt instruments by issuing new and larger amounts of debt. Up to now the Federal Reserve interest has made this debacle survivable.

At this time the interest payments on the United States national debt is the government’s largest monthly expenditure. The world is waking up to the fact that the U.S. government is truly insolvent and that the benefits of propping up the U.S. dollar will no longer be worth the expense to foreign creditors. The U.S. government Ponzi scheme is being exposed for the world to see.

China is becoming more reluctant to continue buying U.S. treasuries as it positions the yuan to be the world’s new reserve currency. Japan needs to raise $300 billion to rebuild parts of their country that were destroyed by the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster. They will be unable to invest handily in the U.S. or may opt to invest outright in China as money is available. The U.S. desperately needs Japan and the Arab world to roll over national treasuries into larger amounts of new ones. With Arab revolutions taking place across major Saudi states and the U.S. occupying Libya for no good reason at all, the nation is likely see a global disdain for its previously valued treasures that it must sell to cope with the runaway spending and deficits of Congress.

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January 28, 2009

Congress: We are not the Experts (The Real Truth about the U.S. Economy)

kanjorski-banking-economyIn a CSPAN interview, Democrat Representative Paul Kanjorski, the Capitol Markets Subcommittee Chairman, made some revealing confessions about the expertise of the U.S. House and Senate, the facts behind the scenes during the EESA Stimulus plan last year and the real plight of the U.S. economy.

the actions of the Secretary of Treasury and EESA bailout

“Things were done that were misunderstood. We did not give the $700 million for the purpose of lending money. It was never in the program (TARP, EESA) It was misconstrued initially and put together with the suggestion by the Secretary of Treasury that we would be buying what we called dirty assets, defective mortgages and securities in these banks and that the government would find a way to create a market, buy them in, take them off the balance sheets so that the banks could continue to function normally…I supported that. But another part of the bill, we gave jurisdiction and authority to the Secretary of the Treasury to make investments in banks. He had very wide authority because, quite frankly, we (Congress) are not the experts on the Hill as how to solve this problem and the problem is multifaceted, so we gave great flexibility to Secretary of Treasury to act.”

The near collapse of the economy and U.S. government

“I was there when the Secretary and the Chairman of Federal Reserve came those days and talked with members of Congress about what was going on. It was about September 15th. Here’s the facts: we don’t even talk about these things. On Thursday, at about 11 o’clock in the morning, the Federal Reserve noticed a tremendous drawdown of Money Market Accounts in the United States to the tune of $550 billion. It was being drawn within the space of an hour or two. The Treasury opened up it’s window to help. They pumped $105 billion into the system and quickly realized that they could not stem the tide. We were having an electronic run on the banks. The decided to close down the operation, close down the money accounts and announce a guarantee of $250,000 per account so that there wouldn’t be further panic out there. That is what actually happened. What if they had not done that? Their estimation was that by 2 o’clock that afternoon $5.5 trillion would have been drawn out of the money market system of the United States, would have collapsed the entire economy of the United States and would have, in 24 hours, the world economy would have collapsed. We talked about, at that time, what would have happened, if that had happened. It would have been the end of our economic system and our political system as we know it.”

“That’s why, when they made the point, we’ve got to act and do things quickly, we did. Now, Secretary Paulson said, Let’s buy out these subprime mortgages. Give us latitude and large authority to do many things as we decide necessary and give us $700 billion to do that. Shortly after we enacted our bill with those very broad powers, the UK came out and said ‘No, we don’t have enough money to buy toxic assets. Instead, we are going to put our money into banks so that their equity grows and they’re not bankrupt. The UK started that process. That’s true, it was much cheaper to put more money in banks as equity investments than to start buying their bad assets. It was early determined that we would have to spend 3 to 4 billion dollars of taxpayer money to buy these bad assets. We didn’t have it. We only had $700 billion.”

“So Paulson made a complete switch, went in and started putting money in and buying securities and investing in banks in the United States. Why? Because if you don’t have a banking system, you don’t have an economy. Although we did that, we didn’t have enough money and as fast as we did that, the economy has been falling. We are really no better off than we were off today than we were three months ago because we have had an decrease in the equity positions of banks. Other assets are going sour by the moment.”

the real truth of the matter according to Paul Kanjorski

“Now, we’ve got to make some decisions. Do we pour more money in to the extent that the money goes in…I, myself, think that we ought to take the time, analyze where we are, have the people (American public) understand…We need to really inform (the public) as to the facts and get input (from them). Perhaps (the public) has better ideas. We aren’t any geniuses in economics or finance. We are representatives of the people. We ought to take our time, but let the people know that this is a very difficult struggle. Somebody threw us out in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean without a life raft and we are trying to determine the closest shore and whether there is any chance in the world to swim that far. WE…DON’T…KNOW.”

Remember who actually threw the economy into “the middle of the Atlantic Ocean without a life raft.” We can offer that credit to greedy unscrupulous bankers, a corrupt banking community, unattentive government regulators and politicians that gloried in the temporary economic bubble that the moral bankruptcy created. Never forget that America! ~ E. Manning

U.S. stimulus trivia: the latest stimulus provision provides enough spending to give every man, woman, and child in America $2,700.
President Obama has said that his proposed “stimulus legislation” will create or save 3 million jobs. This means that this legislation will spend at least $275,000 per job. The average household income in the U.S. is $42,000 a year. The way that the stimulus is currently written will probably save mostly state and federal government jobs. The current stimulus is not designed principally for economic stimulus for Main Street.

January 18, 2009

Economic Panic: Frying Pan to the Fire

As the economy risks spinning out of control and banks continue to run up multi-billion dollar losses, the Obama administration will face tough choices with the $350 billion remaining in the bailout plan. With the bailout of General Motors by converting it to a bank holding company, some boundaries were set where corporate welfare is concerned. This has stopped most of big corporate Main Street from expecting direct government bailouts so far. There are many institutions that still want a piece of the bailout pie. The result is likely to be a shortage of bailout money.

The rumor is that the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) will be used to build a “bank” that holds the toxic debt, a repository of toxicity that moves those debts firmly into government hands. The government is hoping beyond hope that at some time in the future, those debts will increase in value once the recession is in hand and the economy has returned to health. (more…)

January 16, 2009

Treasury Bails Out Bank of America

rainy day for B of A

rainy day for B of A

Since the beginning of economic contraction, Bank of America, has been buying up banks and assets from failed institutions such as Merrill Lynch. Now is a rainy day for Bank of America, a toxic debt laden bank in danger of failure.

After taking recent value write offs on toxic debts, the U.S. Treasury and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation are providing protection against unusually large losses on approximately $118 billion of loans, securities backed by residential and commercial real estate loans and related faulty assets. (more…)

January 14, 2009

U.S. Politics: Banks Must do their Part

financial security trouble

financial security trouble

What the Bush administration thoroughly disregarded as a possible solution for toxic banking assets and mortgage foreclosures for the last year, Obama and the new government order in Congress have picked up as a gold card solution.

Perhaps the FDIC is no longer a lonely stepchild agency calling in the political wilderness. Calls by bankers and lawmakers to use the remaining bailout funds for the “original purpose” of buying toxic assets have resulted in new political impetus. The view of the FDIC is that the government’s financial rescue efforts have not gone far enough and that troubled asset relief is necessary to get banks lending at more normal levels and to attract private capital.

The plan places (more…)

January 9, 2009

A TARP Bailout Program for Consumers?

furrowed political brows

furrowed political brows

The failed U.S. TARP bailout program legislated by the EESA last year has been ungoing review by the Obama Ascension Team and the likes of Treasury Secretary-elect Timothy Geithner, former Fed member and sycophant. Furrowed brows and eye bags have become a way of life in politics. Managing the program has become an impossible and failed task. President Obama will be responsible for determining what to do with the remaining unspent TARP funds. The Obama Team is examining ways to expand the government program to generate loans to municipalities, small businesses and consumers.

Many in Congress seem to agree that the existing government program should be revamped rather than refunded. Many elected officials agree that the remaining money should be used to stop the national foreclosure crisis instead of a continuation of current policy where Wall Street firms receive continued assistance to pay bonuses to executives and dividends to shareholders as promoted by the Bush administration.

monopoly-moneyAs if the U.S. needs yet more government agencies, Geithner is considering creating a new bureau within Treasury to oversee the existing TARP funds. Adding oversight personnel to government measures has proved to be a failed premise, especially since any provision lags far behind the need. Any potential for work backs up due to lack of staffing, if staffing is ultimately provided over the long haul. Such provisions are more like a governmental agency employment and monetary ponzi scheme than professional organization. So far, overseeing TARP funds has been a disaster, largely made secret because of banking bailouts.

Meanwhile, banks in Britain are laying off staff while bringing malleable interns into the fold as underpaid and temporary junior staff, a move that could catch on in the United States: a cost-saving and control-oriented corporate move that has been all the rage outside of banking. British banks are counting on business picking up after the recession, rationalizing that young blood needs to be on tap for the occasion. Swiss-owned banks are notorious for this practice.

be an intern

be an intern

Corporate America has caused the economic crisis and now that they have been bailed out with taxpayer money, are seeking to continue to take advantage of people with the damage they have caused. Government seems to back up this thinking, which is ultimately destructive rather than constructive. Self-serving behavior continues unabated in government and corporate life. Now that truly is worldly wisdom at its’ worst. Anyone that chose to run personal finances in the same way wouldn’t last long, hence the benefits of corporate/governmental leveraging and power borrowed from the taxpayer.

Whether the American taxpayer can possibly benefit from all the confusion remains to be seen. ~ E. Manning

November 23, 2008

Citigroup Saved by Federal Reserve and TARP

citigroup1In headier times a mere six months ago, Citigroup was discussing the sale of assets to raise cash flow and liquidity. With the stock market value of Citigroup plummeting, one of the larger international bank groups has now been saved this morning through the Federal Reserve. This is undoubtedly designed to build confidence in the markets this week as the economy continues to flag amid record job losses in America.

Citigroup is one of the world’s largest owners of toxic collateralized debt obligations (CDOs). This pool of bonds has created one of the largest victims in the financial crisis.

The U.S. Treasury and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation is providing liquidity against the possibility of unusually large losses on an asset pool of approximately $306 billion of loans and securities backed by residential and commercial real estate, which will remain on Citigroup’s balance sheet. As a fee for this arrangement, Citigroup will issue preferred shares to the U.S. Treasury and FDIC.

The U.S. Treasury has invested $20 billion in Citigroup from the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) in exchange for preferred stock with an 8% dividend to the U.S. Treasury. ~ E. Manning

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