Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

April 12, 2010

Multinational America & Cheap Labor

Even highly educated Americans can hardly win with a nationwide crisis of underemployed and unemployed. Clearly, America lives in the age of the wage slave, a time of mindlessness and lack of creativity. Corporate America remains addicted to outsourcing overseas, especially where cheap Indian labor is concerned. Now globalist academia, notably the University of Houston, is outsourcing teaching assistant jobs to India. Globalists are doing much more than that. Even Houston is a new center of foreign training basking in the warmth of  globalist conceit. Meanwhile, Bill Gates vis-à-vis Microsoft, has continued to sack the prospect of American jobs by sending them overseas. Since Gates can’t bring Indian help legally into America by the truckload, he is sending precious jobs overseas at a time when an unprecedented number of qualified educated Americans are out of work. Almost half of the those on the unemployed rosters have been out of work for more than six months. It seems to me that the time is nigh to outsource the national sociopaths.

It is high time to move away from the falsehood of corporate globalism to consider employing educated U.S. citizens. Having experience myself in dealing with teams of the hired from Mumbai, I must admit that they seem to be bright people on the surface. They are humble and do what they are told. Hell yes, they are eager to please! That is where the panacea ends folks! You will tell them again and again, yes… and again. You will spend hours in special conference calls dealing with “the meeting of the minds,” as they continue to pour out work that most children can do.

Multinationals: your jobs building another nation.

The communication and cultural barrier looms large as work is redone over and over. As far as being eager to please, this is hardly a surprise since corporate buildings spring from some of the worst slums of India, corporate neighbors that gleam in contrast to some of the worst ghettos the world will see. Who wants to leave a pretty polished office in favor of a human black-hole of mud and cardboard? It is time to fully realize that this is a human rights issue. Elevating foreigners that live in mud holes seems to be the human thing to do, unless you are merely elevating them to the underpaid wage-slave status as they fight in their minds about what the hell is in the minds and attitudes of managers in Corporate America. Surely “Bob Cratchit” had it no better and we have the nerve to think that globalism is doing them a favor, kind of like how imperial Britain was good for India too.

Meanwhile, the good boys and girls at Deloitte, Price Waterhouse , Microsoft, IBM and the whole lot of lousy multinational sleezoids continue to undermine and use an entire planet of human beings for what is good for corporate needs at the moment while basking in the glow of sustainability and green politics. You can add all of Wall Street and their overseas markets to the list too because this behavior is all the same thing.

Behind the corporate scenes in India, destined for a third world U.S.A.

That isn’t enough for “Multinational America.” This well-funded, organized racket is built on lies of an American labor shortage that oozes from ivy league “innovation.” They have legitimized the crime of selling out “spoiled Americans” in the hope of instilling and importing India’s caste system into the United States for their own benefit. They are debasing the nation so they can continue to ply their usury on the nation as they pimp globalism to proffer their bottom line and the meaning of their miserable existence. So much for socially responsible behavior. Too bad that President Obama doesn’t have the good sense to charge this modern-day pack of miscreants with treason. These are the sort that only Benedict Arnold could love.

Meanwhile, they can bask in the glow of globalism, an effort to justify the behavior of sociopaths. Believe me, these kids from India aren’t paying the bill. Multinational corporations are.

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July 19, 2009

Economic Depression: American Resentment Flickers Against Corporate Wealth

money green with envyThe recession and the rising gulf between the haves and have nots; investment bankers versus newly impoverished and unemployed Americans is changing viewpoints. At one time, any company reporting record profits was certain to earn applause for this was seen as the American way. Americans were firmly invested in what they believed was the trickle-down theory of economics. The scam that investment bankers have pulled on the world with their highly staked leveraging games has changed much of this sentiment. Now that institutions that formerly made up the investment banking capital of the world are recovering with the intent of paying back taxpayer-backed Federal Reserve bailout money, Americans are leering at the possibilities that nothing has been learned from the crisis of financial literacy that prevails itself upon the world.

Writer David Segal has introduced the idea that class resentment is to blame as investment bankers continue to rake in the speculation-based financial dough based on the same numbers games that brought the nation to the edge of financial oblivion. The reality runs much deeper. In the eyes of Americans, the reality isn’t about making money, but how money is earned. Americans feel that they are being scammed because the nation operates by multiple sets of rules depending on how much money and influence you can peddle. Even members of Congress like Charles Schumer have demonstrated that they believe Americans are simply brutes to be used by the system to bolster corporate along with government wealth and influence.

Now that the likes JP Morgan Chase and Goldman Sachs are reporting fantastic encouraging numbers after having enjoyed bailout at the expense of Americans and the system at large, Americans see that the victory is very hollow. Recent financial victories in American are without benefit to anyone that doesn’t directly play the insider financial games on Wall Street. Multinational corporations continue to rule the roost behind the scenes, taking more out of America than they put in. Profit without personal responsibility is king. Most of America continues to be in great pain and America already knows that recent financial victory on Wall Street is a result of the same deluded thinking and policy that still threatens to destroy the financial system. It is not a system based on honesty and real numbers, but simply a gambling game of manipulation and opportunity.

The fact is that the Federal Government likes the control and authority that it wields in the banking community as a result of the bailout. The same can be said for the money that government has invested in the corporate structure. Uncle Sam holds the cards as the government maintains a front row seat at AIG. This is the only means that government now has to rein in the continued greed and avarice of Wall Street and corporate investors. The system hasn’t been reinvented as promised nor have sufficient reforms taken place to insure the safety of financial system on any level. We are still living in the last century. Nothing has changed. That is why government is so quiet about what is a hollow victory on Wall Street. ~ E. Manning

May 8, 2009

The New Brand of Corporatism: Unemployment

unemployedThe fruits of the ‘new brand’ of corporatism have squarely placed the nation and world where it is today. Corporate cheerleaders and government experts are now combining forces to create a new outlook that fully accepts policy of the last few decades. For many decades, government has quietly adjusted record keeping to massage public statistics.  Once again, corporatism and a fully complicit government is seeking to adjust the future of the United States by redefining full employment. This vanity seeks to install the idea that we don’t need economic health or reasonable employment to enjoy record profits or the ideal of prosperity. If we can’t have prosperity the way the leaders of corporatism want, they will simply redefine that definition of prosperity to fit their own mold while continuing to blow their own horns.

The experts want the nation to bite off on the notion that “post-recession America” will be stressed with high unemployment even after the good times return. Good times for who? Obviously, the outlook of good times without a sizable portion of the United States participating involves only the outlook of corporate bodies and the capability of maintaining or promoting profits for the structure of the current system in place. The economy of the whole of the nation isn’t being considered, at least not realistically.

unemployment4Millions of jobs have vanished forever. Most will find it harder than ever to get hired again. The idea is being promoted that we will be required to accept lower earnings and a diminished economic role in the country as the rich get richer and the poor and disenfranchised fall off the economic map and into government assistance. As it stands approximately 54% of America that is employed is paying for the rest of America’s unemployed, disabled, retired and imprisoned.

unemployed1The ‘new brand’ of corporatism considers that employment has nothing to do with economic prosperity. Politicians and ‘economic corporatists’ console themselves and hopefully the populace by stating that the natural rate of unemployment neither accelerates or decelerates inflation.  They want us to accept a markedly higher ‘natural rate’ of unemployment by disassociating employment from the economy.

All this is drizzled by the news media with the admission that there is no relief in sight for the unemployed. By the admission of many, like Laurence Ball, it will be a long time before the nation sees 5 percent unemployment rates.

Then the media fully deploys the most heinous part of the corporate plan. The more time that workers spend without a job, the less attractive they become. Why? Ostensibly because the unemployed are not keeping up with ‘new technology’. This skewed outlook of corporatism is expected to keep the unemployment rate elevated. In the same breath, the experts say that the unemployed become discouraged and change lifestyle. Corporatism has dealt America a very nasty blow indeed and isn’t finished yet. Should Americans continue to bite off on the same old political and social wisdom of the past? We have a right and the privilege to reinvent ourselves. I encourage you to get on the road to reinventing yourself and standing on your own two feet without being dependent on corporatism. Otherwise, you have very little to look forward to beyond spending endless amounts of cash on dubious college training to continue to tickle corporatism’s insane fancies. ~ E. Manning

July 17, 2008

U.S. Fed Discusses the Real Economy

Recently, the Fed discussed the housing market and economic slump in its’ latest open meeting. Currently, the housing market is one of the single largest factors in the U.S. economic decline. According to the Fed, the outlook for the housing market remained bleak, with falling prices, slow sales, high inventories of unsold homes, and further declines in construction activity over coming months.

Despite level borrowing from the Fed, mortgage rates have been increased and foreclosures continue to rise in the United States. Falling wealth and real income, tightening credit conditions, rising energy prices, and sharply declining consumer sentiment were seen as likely to restrain consumer spending later this year, particularly after the effects of the fiscal stimulus trail off.

The economic stimulus as dispensed (more…)

April 10, 2008

Wall Street Expects 35% Job Losses

As if the latest round of job losses hasn’t been bad enough, the U.S. should expect to have record numbers of unemployed from Wall Street investment firms. Wall Street investment banks hit by mortgage losses and writedowns have slashed more than 34,000 jobs in the past nine months.

The leveraged credit market fueled a record boom in private-equity buyouts before investors began shunning high-yield loans and bonds last year. Standard & Poor’s estimated on April 1 that banks still hold about $213 billion of leveraged loans they can’t sell, which are essentially worthless and threaten the very fabric of banking with liquidity issues.

15,000 investment jobs were lost last month, but some analysts expected 150,000. Essentially, the job market has been holding on. Since a sudden collapse hasn’t happened, the expectations of little more impact on the job market has been high. Some analysts are feeling bolder with every day that passes without a major collapse. With the financing of investment banks, the Federal Reserve has put a new floor in the economy.

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