Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

February 4, 2011

Bernanke: Catastrophic Implications for U.S. Economy

Filed under: banking, business, corporatism, economy, federal reserve, government, money, recession — Tags: , , , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 6:09 am

 

USA facing debt crisis

Ben Bernanke of U.S. Federal Reserve has warned that the failure to promptly raise the national debt ceiling would catastrophic.  This catastrophe would clearly have a negative impact on paper assets denominated in dollars and other fiat currencies.

Bernanke was blunt about the threats by some congressional Republicans to use the upcoming debt-ceiling vote as sledgehammer to force harsh spending cuts:

“I would very much urge Congress not to focus on the debt limit as being the bargaining chip in this discussion, but rather to address directly the spending and tax issues that we have to deal with in order to make progress on this fiscal situation,”

“Beyond a certain point … the United States would be forced into a position of defaulting on its debt. And the implications of that on our financial system, our fiscal policy and our economy would be catastrophic.”

It’s important to realize that Bernanke did not use his typical conservative language regarding the necessity of addressing U.S. fiscal challenges. To the contrary, he painted a bleak picture of the possible consequences of failing to act:

“… if government debt and deficits were actually to grow at the pace envisioned, the economic and financial effects would be severe. Sustained high rates of government borrowing would both drain funds away from private investment and increase our debt to foreigners, with adverse long-run effects on U.S. output, incomes, and standards of living. Moreover, diminishing investor confidence that deficits will be brought under control would ultimately lead to sharply rising interest rates on government debt and, potentially, to broader financial turmoil. In a vicious circle, high and rising interest rates would cause debt-service payments on the federal debt to grow even faster, causing further increases in the debt-to-GDP ratio and making fiscal adjustment all the more difficult.”

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December 27, 2010

Hyperinflation Projected by 2015

Filed under: banking, business, central bank, corporatism, economy, inflation — Tags: , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 2:18 am

October 9, 2010

World economy breaking with US

As the US economy teeters on the edge of decline and a double dip recession, emerging economies continue to grow at a fast pace, fueled by multinational corporations. This changing global economy reveals a United States that is not the center of the economic world.

Financial leaders have joined hands to decide how to boost the global economy at the annual IMF and World Bank meeting. A number of these financial leaders suggest a break up, what is known as a “de-coupling”, in the wings for a number of years, but gaining traction as the US economy stagnates. Central bankers, along with complicit US politicians, have rode the US horse into the ground and now have their eyes on the next rising star to enhance their prosperity. Most politicians advertise that the US will live forever, even though powerhouse nations through history have ebbed like the tidal flow.

The world is breaking away from the US as the consumer of last resort,” said analyst Edward Harrison, the founder of CreditWriteDowns.com. “You’ll see a lot more importance in China, in Russia.” Corporate multinationals and US politicians have raided the US economy over the last thirty years and put that stock in other economies like China, Brazil, Russia and India in the name of globalism. The view is that growth in the global economy will be much more dependent upon these countries than on the “developed economies.” Whether this is true or not remains to be seen.

Meanwhile, the US continues to run by idiot lawmakers that are afraid of multinational corporate power or are having their pockets lined behind the scenes. Like the old Roman Empire, the US seems bent on its’ own self-destruction to salve the interests of a few “leaders of men.”

April 4, 2010

Jobs: Comparing Recessions

Filed under: economy, recession — Tags: , , , , , , , , , — digitaleconomy @ 12:46 pm

Jobs: Recession Comparisons
15 million Americans are unemployed and looking for work. Discouraged workers that are not seeking employment are not counted in that total. The U.S. economy added 162,000 jobs in March, the biggest monthly net gain in three years, even though the published unemployment rate remains at 9.7 per cent.

The chart above shows job changes in this recession compared to recent ones, with the blue line representing the current downturn. The line has ticked upward, but still has a long way to go before the job market fully recovers to its pre-recession level.

February 23, 2009

PM Brown: New Global Economy

pm-brown-berlusconi-romeBritish Prime Minister Gordon Brown has stressed the importance of April’s G20 ‘Economic Recovery Summit’ in London in the bid to strike a “global deal” that will “speed up the recovery of the world economy”. He and other European Union members are advocating a new global financial system, but have backed off somewhat due to the reluctance of U.S. support. His recent statement in Rome revealed that all nations need to inject resources into their own economies as well as agree on ways to reform international institutions.

Currently, he is recommending new policies that he calls ‘fairness principles’ against “old excesses” in the banking community, a standard of stewardship instead of speculation. In the meantime, Brown and other European Union members are advocating unity in opposing moves towards protectionist trade policies. They see the U.S. as a major opponent where such policies are concerned.

Back in the United States, international bank holding company, Citigroup continues its precipitous decline. The U.S. government is looking at boosting its’ controlling interest in the banking firm to boost confidence and maintain solvency from toxic debt, part of the speculation that PM Gordon Brown was referring to.  Britain is dealing with similar issues relating to the Royal Bank of Scotland. ~ E. Manning

July 16, 2008

Recovery Slow in U.S., Inflation Out of Control

For some time, the Fed has remained hopeful of a quick recovery, despite lingering signs of trouble. The Fed is lining up with the current reality. Ben Bernanke is fighting hard to keep the economy growing with fighting inflation as his top priority per his testimony before the Senate Banking Committee. He still refuses to admit that the U.S. economy is in a recession. His goal is to strengthen the economy over the strength of the dollar. He is uncertain about the value of a second economic stimulus move.

Because of the turmoil in the economy and banking industry, Bernanke has flagged his optimism somewhat, announcing that growth will eventually pick up over the next two years.

Years ago, no one would have expected oil futures to be running the economy, yet (more…)

February 20, 2008

Landmark Fed Decision for Open Market

Today, the Federal Reserve Board and the Federal Open Market Committee released the minutes of the Committee meeting held on January 29-30, 2008:

moneywheelbarrow.jpgIn a new confirmation measure at that FOMC meeting, the Federal Reserve has been authorized to purchase and sell securities and bonds to serve as a protection to the economy of the United States. Essentially, the Fed of New York “has been given” carte blanche to influence and sustain the open securities marketplace and to use whatever means it deems necessary to prevent a financial catastophe through purchasing on the open market.

Constitutionally, I am not certain what authority the FOMC (more…)

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