Busted: Bankers and The Global Economy

May 12, 2011

Dangerous Inflation is on the Way

Filed under: economy, inflation, recession, stagflation — Tags: , , , — digitaleconomy @ 12:01 pm

I’ve written about false inflation figures for years. The U.S. government continues to pretend that Americans won’t be facing dangerous inflation by 2012. The facts show otherwise.

The Producer Price Index (PPI) increased 0.7% last month. This equates to 8.4% annual wholesale inflation in America! Prices are rising much faster than wages by any means.  April wholesale inflation data reflects an ever-accelerating cost of living in 2011.

Can official government statistics be trusted? Not according to John Williams at Shadowstats.com, whose alternative inflation index shows costs rising four times higher than “official” rates. Since 1980, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) has changed the way it calculates the Consumer Price Index (CPI) in order to account for the substitution of products, improvements in quality and other things.

“Near-term circumstances generally have continued to deteriorate,” says Williams. “Though not yet commonly recognized, there is both an intensifying double-dip recession and a rapidly escalating inflation problem.”

November 10, 2010

Obama: Embrace Globalism And The Emerging One World Economy

Barack Obama made some interesting comments about the USA economy and American attitudes during a joint commentary in Mumbai, India.

President Obama made these comments about the Federal Reserve, effectively a “no comment” statement.

The Federal Reserve is an independent body. It doesn’t take orders from the White House, and it’s important as a policy matter, as an institutional matter, that we don’t comment on particular Fed actions.

About offshoring or outsourcing, President Obama made the following remarks:

I don’t think you’ve heard me make outsourcing a bogeyman during the course of my visit. In fact, I explicitly said in my address in Mumbai to the Business Council that I think both countries are operating on some stereotypes that have outlived their usefulness.

I want to be able to say to the American people when they ask me, well, why are you spending time with India, aren’t they taking our jobs? — I want to be able to say, actually, you know what, they just created 50,000 jobs. And that’s why we shouldn’t be resorting to protectionist measures; we shouldn’t be thinking that it’s just a one-way street. I want both the citizens in the United States and citizens in India to understand the benefits of commercial ties between the two countries.

Essentially, the attitude of President Obama and Indian Prime Minister Singh is one of tough nuts to America. They advertise outsourcing as good for India and the world.

July 24, 2010

U.S. Worries Over Deflation

The nation has a nasty case of stagnation, fueled by significant employment issues and rising defaults. Prices are falling while most consumers resist buying. When deflation begins and prices fall, it seems like a good thing. Then, lower prices cut into business profits which results in trimming payrolls. This further undermines buying power, which leads to lower profits, fewer jobs and lower wages. All this results in economic contraction.

With all the cutbacks, buyers that have the funds wait for better deals through even lower prices, which magnifies deflation. As a result, the nation plunges into a downward economic spiral that is hard to escape. This is exactly what the United States faces.

The nation’s capital is feeling the guilt as they look at other in dismay about the rising deficit and inflation, even though they advertise to the world that inflation doesn’t exist here. Economists around the world see great potential for deflation of the dollar, which already would be the case, were it not for declining currencies across the globe.

The statistics say it all. Consumer prices have declined each month for the last three months, putting inflation above last year. They claim that the core inflation rate is at a 44 year low at less than one percent. So why are they worried? The Federal Reserve likes to see an inflation rate of 3% because this puts more money in their corporate pockets.

Private economists and financial experts are more concerned. Some of them see the possibility of deflation at more than fifty percent. This is compounded by unemployment, lack of production and lower spending.

Should deflation occur, the central bank has the tools to reverse it according to Ben Bernanke, even though the Federal Reserve has interest rates at historical lows and has pumped trillions into the financial system. The books have been cooked baby, to the loss of the United States. Bernanke claims the U.S. economy is more vibrant and productive than Japan’s was in the 90s. The difference is supposed to be that Japan’s labor face was actually declining, while the States has plenty of labor.

In my words, there are plenty of financially-broken and impoverished Americans to take advantage of, with the hope of restoring the economy on their collective backs. Wall Street and multinationals aren’t suffering beyond the losses of jobs they incurred during the recession. Let’s face facts, they didn’t suffer much at all. Their employees did. That’s the way it is.

The little guy at the bottom, so far, is the one that has truly paid for the recession and the remainder of its fallout. They are ones that will continue to pay.

June 26, 2009

Jobs and Inflation: Bernanke Kisses Up

labor statistics May 2009“…the Federal Reserve aims for maximum employment and price stability. To achieve those goals, we must formulate policy based on our best assessment of where the economy is heading. Clearly, the timeliness and reliability of your labor market and price reports are critical to us. Besides those monthly indicators, our analysis and forecasting of inflation and real activity require a number of BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics)  inputs. We need to understand productivity because it is a key element in determining how fast the economy can expand without generating inflation. And we need to factor in trends in wages and benefits, in consumer spending, and in how U.S. wage, price, and productivity trends compare with those abroad. Indeed, the analysis, research, and forecasting that forms the foundation for our policymaking must be grounded in solid economic information, such as the BLS provides.” ~ Chairman Ben S. Bernanke at the Bureau of Labor Statistics 125th Anniversary Celebration in Washington, D.C.

May 4, 2009

Krugman: Falling Wages and a Recovery

Paul Krugman makes some excellent points:

So what should we conclude from the growing evidence of sagging wages in America? Mainly that stabilizing the economy isn’t enough: we need a real recovery.

But the unemployment rate is almost certainly still rising. And all signs point to a terrible job market for many months if not years to come — which is a recipe for continuing wage cuts, which will in turn keep the economy weak.

To break that vicious circle, we basically need more: more stimulus, more decisive action on the banks, more job creation.

Credit where credit is due: President Obama and his economic advisers seem to have steered the economy away from the abyss. But the risk that America will turn into Japan — that we’ll face years of deflation and stagnation — seems, if anything, to be rising.

The Falling Wage Syndrome by Paul Krugman

Inflation-adjusted American wages have remained ‘stagnant’ since 1975 but the cost of living has steadily increased. This contributes to the use of credit, the nation’s current plight regarding credit slavery and the high prices of market goods, notably automobiles. The recovery of the auto industry, for example, depends on moving cars and trucks. The problem remains in high prices versus wages of Americans. Houston: we have a problem.

In a review of the Census Bureau’s Historical Income Tables, the truth is not stagnation in an actual sense.  For example, the median income for white men fell nearly 10% between 1974 and 1982. The income for the same group climbed 15% from 1982 to 2007. Income for women increased only slightly between 1974 and 1982 and actually fell slightly for blacks during the same period. Meanwhile costs and expenses spiraled out of control at an annual average inflation rate hovering around 10%, fostered by runaway spending created by credit.

Some argue that wages have increased by 40% since the 1970’s. A recent study by the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis discovered that wages for the average American worker went up by 20 percent between 1975 and 2005. However, one cannot accept the current 3% inflation rate pushed by the Federal Reserve and the federal government as fact. Assuming an average 10% inflation rate which is closer to truth, neither 20% or 40% hold a candle to the real and hidden inflation rate. Given a median inflation rate of 10%, you are looking a loss of buying power at a staggering 100% every ten years instead of a professed 30% reduction in buying power. Now you know where the problem really is. Inflation is not our friend. Living on predatory and usurious credit has come at great cost to the entire globe. The bottom line is that a liberal fractional reserve that has allowed runaway credit is truly responsible for the current plight of global financial malaise. The current mindset continues that monetary credit is the answer to the global meltdown. The actions of central bankers continue to dilute the value of the dollar as global currency.

November 8, 2008

Where has inflation gone?

inflationary-dollarFor those that are wondering where all the inflation-talk has gone, look no farther than the back-burner economic news articles. In fact, Dallas Federal Reserve President Richard Fisher says that inflationary forces have vaporized. Don’t you believe it. Right now, the only concern is for the hope of stability and authorities are bent on that match. The economy is so depressed coupled with global recession that the immediate inflationary pressures have moderated. Other than housing prices, do you see any real pricing changes? Are prices down at all? America still has inflation, but hyperinflationary pressures have cooled.

securityWages are down. The middle class and below is suffering. America has stagflation, a nasty mix of inflation and a stagnant economy. What’s more, any measure of heightened inflation in the future isn’t being discussed with the idea that if we don’t talk about it, inflation won’t happen. The United States faces the same plight as Japan did in the 1990’s. However, right now, the U.S. dollar is not deflated in comparison with other benchmark currencies because of the global span of the crisis. Mr. Fisher says the dollar isn’t deflated, but admits that we will see “headline inflation.” Every measure taken in an effort to insure economic stability is destined to propel inflation to new heights. That isn’t now, so who cares as long as we can cool the heat now. This detracts from the idea that the United States has a major national security issue. ~ E. Manning

September 4, 2008

Inflation: Sick of the “I” Word

Yes. Every American knows what the Fed is reluctant to admit. The economy is struggling. Prices remain high. Booyah. It’s a revelation.

It took the Fed and the federal government almost 9 months to admit the truth about the mortgage, banking and finance debacle. They had all the facts and saw it coming. They looked the other way in the hope that you might not notice or in the vain hope that a pied piper might come along and enchant all the rats. Shortly after that mortgage and finance truth was reinforced by reality, Bear Stearns collapsed, threatening the fall of U.S. investment bankers. Now the Federal Reserve has effectively nationalized every important sector of the banking community within the United States in the effort to keep the show running in the spirit of confidence. The federal government a/k/a the American taxpayer is theoretically on the hook for the entire expense, enslaving the nation to an uncertain future unless we wise up.

We’ve heard about the “R” word, but never has another word meant more to a nation or a global economy in consternation than the infamous “I” word that economists, writers and politicians cannot fail to utter in quiet undertones of fear. What make the “I” word so dangerous is the lack of power against it. Inflation isn’t just a cycle. Inflation is a symptom of unbridled lack of discipline and theft by the Federal Reserve and central bankers themselves. The fact is that authorities have decided that if we mention inflation enough, the public will actually stop taking it seriously.

Inflation has been described as “creeping.” Inflation may well be creepy and may well be advancing, but inflation has showed its ugliness rather dramatically. The nation faces higher inflation than in more than 20 years. Even worse, the nation flutters on the brink of truly nasty stagflation.

The officials in charge won’t readily admit such a thing. First, we have invented hard and fast rules about such topics. Economics is a science say many experts. We have strict definitions for these kinds of things say leaders. That depends on what school of thought you choose to believe. Still, you may be right if you consider economics to be on the same level of science as evolution. The best and the brightest are still unresolved about both except where it fits an agenda for power as they constantly update the facts in an effort to make their case.

In the meantime, prognosticaters are expecting a “rough patch” to come up soon. This patch could happen at any time. Christmas is going to be very bad, business pundits say in prophecy. Bad depends on the level of expectations. If consumers continue to retrench by only buying what they need, the economy is doomed in the eyes business retailers and tax collectors.

American consumers may be in a “slump”, but business and government is in the midst of a crisis. Government has grown to depend on more consumption and rosy projections to raise operating funds by taxation. Business has grown to depend on cheap foreign labor to slash expenses while raising prices. Inflation comes as much from greed and usury of the little guy on both sides as it does from devaluation of American currency and weakness in the dollar.

Food and fuel prices have knocked inflationary values out of the park recently. The Fed says that fuel prices have moderated somewhat, but are still elevated. Considering that the average barrel of oil averaged about $37.00 in 2004, the word elevated is an understatement.

Then the Fed blithely states that wage gains are modest. This is an obscene statement considering that wages have been flat for years, even when adjusted continually for “nominal 3 percent inflation.” No danger for inflationary pressure here because employers are laying off workers in droves in an effort to save the bottom line of business. Employers haven’t been known to be “overly generous” in at least 3 decades.

Manufacturing is weak or declining as corporations close down facilities and offshore jobs to foreign nations with significantly lower wage rates and taxation. The things that America still manufactures like steel, heavy machinery and aircraft are cheaper for foreign buyers because of the weakness of the devalued dollar. This possibility combined with stimulus payments are being given credit for growth figures in the second quarter of 2008.

The largest problem with concepts like recession and inflation is that like every other economic idea, there isn’t much agreement on much of anything. Now that is science. ~ E. Manning

Older Posts »

Blog at WordPress.com.